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WEEDS

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Farmers had a challenging year in 2022 for weed infestations because of a late planting season and dryness, especially in central and southern South Dakota. Kevin Erikson, lead sales representative for Wilbur-Ellis at Salem, South Dakota, discusses recommendations for grappling with weeds, including herbicide resistance, and year-end chemical and fertilizer purchases.
Hessian fly, an insect, was found in Cavalier County, North Dakota, wheat fields, there was a waterhemp infestation in a field in Cavalier County, verticillium wilt was suspected in fields in Cavalier, Pembina and Rolette counties and sudden death syndrome, a fungus, was confirmed in Cavalier County soybean fields.
Tom Peters, a North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota Extension service specialist focused on controlling weeds in sugarbeets and rotation crops, thinks North Dakota’s response to Palmer amaranth weeds needs to step up to a “zero tolerance” stance, or farmers will face a tripling of weed chemical control costs.
Goats On The Go affiliates throughout the U.S. use goats to control nuisance and invasive vegetation on residential and public properties.
A genetic testing laboratory located the campus of North Dakota State University in Fargo provides diagnostic testing for Palmer amaranth, a specially invasive and destructive noxious weed.
It’s not yet life on the farm, but North Dakota State University researchers at the Big Iron farm show in West Fargo, North Dakota, Sept. 13-15, 2022, were demonstrating a research “weedbot,” or robot. The wheeled device uses cameras and artificial intelligence to recognize small weeds growing in major crops. The device has a new sprayer apparatus that is controlled remotely.

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The National Agricultural Genotyping Center has confirmed that several plants found in Hettinger County, North Dakota, were Palmer amaranth.
The state of Minnesota has launched an advertising campaign designed to inform livestock producers of the dangers of purchasing sunflower screenings, non-certified hay and other feeds from out-of-state, including North Dakota, because of the Palmer amaranth threat. State officials say the concerns are particularly strong at the Red River border between Minnesota and North Dakota, where several counties have Palmer amaranth infestations. The danger is particularly acute for the sugarbeet crop, which has few chemical tools to fight it.
The North Dakota Agriculture Department has confirmed that two plants on the side of the road in Traill County have been determined to be Palmer amaranth.

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