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SOYBEANS

The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton and the Green Bison plant at Spiritwood are signs of the growing demand for renewable fuel as well as feed for the livestock industry.
Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
Dwayne Gorder is a northeast South Dakota farmer dropping plans to plant wheat because of the calendar. His first planting near Estelline, South Dakota, was on May 10, 2022.
The World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates are the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s first projections for the 2022-23 crop year.

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The $400 million North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises.
The $400 million North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises.
The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises.
The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises.
In January, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was restricting the use of a herbicide in six Minnesota counties out of concern for an endangered species, a species it chose not to make public. Before the calendar could flip to April, EPA had reversed those restrictions as well as even wider herbicide bans because of an insect called the American burying beetle. So what was behind the initial secretiveness? Why the sudden reversal?
Since dicamba was first registered for use on dicamba-tolerant soybeans in the 2017 growing season, the herbicide drifting onto neighboring property has been an issue. While investigating reports of misuse, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture was able to identify some common label violations.

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We urge communities that are looking at potential ag processing facilities to give the projects a fair shake, but also to do the due diligence needed to make sure that it’s the right project, at the right time, in the right place, with the right partners.
Hillsboro North Dakota, farmer Cindy Pulskamp’s latest hands-on involvement in an agricultural organization is her position on the United Soybean Board.
The soybean plant at Casselton, North Dakota, is expected to crush 42.5 million bushels of soybeans in the first year and is a joint venture between the Minnesota Soybean Processors and Louisiana-based CGB Enterprises. Together, they own North Dakota Soybean Processors, which is holding informational sessions on April 12-13.

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