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SOIL HEALTH

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Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin, owner and founder of Regeneration Farms LLC, and founder and president of the Regenerative Agriculture Alliance, talks about what regenerative means to him, and how his experience farming in the Guatemalan rainforest informs his life today.
Organic Valley will receive $25 million for its carbon insetting program and Edge Dairy Farmer Cooperative will get $50 million for its project aimed at expanding climate-smart markets and establishing dairy and sugar as climate-smart commodities.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture will invest nearly $3 billion in projects to reduce climate-harming emissions from farming and forestry, tripling the funding it had initially envisioned for the program, the agency announced on Wednesday, Sept. 14.
The winter rye reduces soil erosion, suppresses weeds and soaks up excess moisture, the study conducted at the Carrington (North Dakota) Research Extension Center said.
Johnson, who farms near Breckenridge in the southern Red River Valley of Minnesota, spent part of Sept. 1 interseeding a cover crop mixture between the rows of one of his sugarbeet fields.
Five farms in southeast Minnesota are involved in a Land Stewardship Project research project geared to help farmers understand and use cutting-edge composting systems to build soil health naturally.

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A new appreciation has developed for rye, a winter-hardy grain that develops a deep root system. Growing rye is seen as beneficial to soil health, is a strong competitor to weeds, and helps reduce erosion from water and wind. It can be a companion crop to soybeans, edible beans and sugarbeets to cut down on wind damage as plants emerge. In areas with livestock, producers can graze it or harvest it for forage.
About a half dozen farmers in Walsh County, North Dakota, are conducting on-farm research trials on various methods including, minimum till, strip till and “green planting,” which is planting row crops, such as sugarbeets, into growing crops.
North Dakota’s State Conservationist Mary Podoll talks about the realities behind the rhetoric involving the Biden administration cooperation with the so-called “30 by 30” initiative, a worldwide effort to protect resources.

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