SUBSCRIBE NOW 3 months just 99¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

MARKETS

Meteorlogist and commodity trading advisor Jim Roemer is the owner of Best Weather Inc., and co-founder of Climate Predict, a long-range global weather forecast tool.
The markets — and the wheat markets in particular — started off on fire this week, said Don Wick of the Red River Farm Network. But as he and Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management discussed on this week's Agweek Market Wrap, sponsored by Gateway Building Systems, most of the gains were lost by the end of the week.
The weather and various USDA reports continue to be the main drivers in the markets.
Even as the central and eastern parts of the Corn Belt finally are making some planting progress, the western Corn Belt and northern Plains remain mired in wet, cold weather that has kept tractors at a near-standstill, especially in North Dakota and Minnesota, Don Wick of the Red River Farm Network and Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management discussed on the Agweek Market Wrap.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
Weather continues to be the main driver, as cool wet conditions in the northern Plains keep producers out of the field while in the southern Plains hot dry conditions reduced the potential size of the winter wheat crop. Corn and soybeans were under pressure from favorable weather forecasts.
For Ukraine's three main export crops, sunflower production is forecast to be off by 37%, wheat production down by more than 35% and corn production off by 54%, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Thursday, May 12, 2022 in its World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates.
The World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates are the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s first projections for the 2022-23 crop year.
Don Wick of the Red River Farm Network and Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management discuss what late planting in the northern Plains and Corn Belt could mean for corn, wheat and soybean markets, as well as what the Fed is doing on inflation, what inflation means for markets, how world events are impacting the markets and what to watch for in the coming week.
After hitting multiple new contract highs and levels not seen in almost 10 years, the need for a technical retracement was evident.
There's not a lot of rationing happening in the grain market right now, with grains trading at some "pretty lofty levels" during a "choppy week," Don Wick of Red River Farm Network said. Wick joined Randy Martinson, of Martinson Ag Risk Management, on this week's Agweek Market Wrap, sponsored by Gateway Building Systems.

ADVERTISEMENT

Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management discusses how the wild weather of recent weeks has impacted the markets and will continue to impact them into the future as acreage predictions become less clear.
Joe Glauber and David Laborde, economists with the the International Food Policy Research Institute, give a global agriculture outlook and policy on April 25, 2022, at the North American Agricultural Journalists annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
Wheat and corn continue to be the leaders as adverse weather slows planting progress and impacts the potential size of the U.S. southern Plains winter wheat crop and South America’s second corn crop.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT