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DRY EDIBLE BEANS

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Optimal weather conditions during the 2022 growing season appear to have yielded many farmers across the northern Plains and Montana canola, dry edible beans and sunflower yields that are at the least better-than-average and at the best, bumper crops.
As Lily Bergman reflected on her first full-time farming season, she was, overall, pleased.
North Dakota farmers had harvested 77% of their dry edible beans as of the week ending Oct. 2, 2022, and in Minnesota 76% of the state's edible beans had been combined as of that date, the U.S. Agricultural Department National Agricultural Statistics Service said.
About 35 representatives of foreign governments spent a week touring farms, research sites and agribusinesses across Minnesota. Visits ranged from Hormel and soybean farms in the southeast to sugarbeet farms and processing in the Red River Valley.
A desire for the rural lifestyle and the opportunity to carry on the family farming legacy were two of the major reasons that influenced Nick Hagen’s decision to farm.
Denise and Jim Karley own Karley Farm, Johnstown Bean Co. and North Central Commodities Inc., their son Dylan Karley, owns Dylan Karley Farm and is general manager of Johnstown Bean Co. and North Central Commodities Inc, and his sister, Nora Hubbard, is office manager and controller of the two businesses.

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This recipe is loaded with dry edible beans and is sure to be a family pleaser.
The winter rye reduces soil erosion, suppresses weeds and soaks up excess moisture, the study conducted at the Carrington (North Dakota) Research Extension Center said.
The edible bean crop in North Dakota, the No. 1 producer in the United States, was rated 8% excellent, 48% good, 41% fair and 3% poor the week ending Aug. 21, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department National Agricultural Statistics Service.

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