ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

CROP PROGRESS

Latest Headlines
As National Agricultural Statistics Service weekly reports show deepening drought, a Florence, S.D., crop insurance adjuster explains how his yield assessments of oat and wheat crops in northeast South Dakota are allowing drought-struck farmers to decide whether to cut small grains for feed forage or take them to harvest — often with a reduced expected grain yield due to the drought. Includes weekly NASS summary from South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota and Montana.
Farmers Larry Aker, 71, and his son, Steve, 41, are looking for more rain on a farm near Waubay, S.D., in the neighborhood where their family has farmed for 100 years. Corn and soybeans were hanging in there as of June 19, 2021, but have had about half of the rain they should have since April. The National Agricultural Statistics Service on June 28, 2021, shows 25% of South Dakota corn and 23% of the soybeans n good to excellent.
Conditions are ripe in Nebraska for big yields. But in some places, the drought that has plagued other parts of the region is starting to move in. Some ranchers have begun culling deeper into their herds.
The majority of the region's crops fell into the 'good' category, despite the unattractive weather some states have been seeing.
The 2021 planting season is all but wrapped up as the calendar switches from May to June. The crops are emerging ahead of the five-year average, but as has been the story all spring, rain is desperately needed across the region to keep the crops growing.
Due to the dry weather the region has been experiencing, producers in the region have been able to get in their fields and get their planting completed a faster rate than years past.

ADVERTISEMENT

Matt Nelson has wrapped up spring planting this year, as have most other other Midwest farmers, according to the new updated weekly crop progress from the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The report. released May 24, reflects conditions on May 23.
In west central Minnesota, farmers are wrapping up both corn and soybean planting thanks to warm and dry conditions.
Eastern Iowa is a bright spot so far this planting season. It, and other parts of the region, continue to make rapid planting progress.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT