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CORN

Latest Headlines
Farmers in the United States are urging their government to challenge a looming Mexican ban on genetically modified corn under a regional free trade agreement, warning of billions of dollars of economic damage to both countries.
Volunteer corn is more prevalent in the 2022 growing season and can cause some yield losses, but Bruce Potter, an integrated pest management specialist at the University of Minnesota Southwest Research and Outreach Center at Lamberton, Minnesota, said the bigger issues are the insects and diseases that the corn can bring. Of particular concern is the corn rootworm.
South Dakota cattle feeder Steve Masat of Redfield, South Dakota, and Rick Woehlhaff, owner of the Glacial Lakes Livestock in Watertown, South Dakota, reflect on market trends and feed supplies for cattle heading into the fall and winter.
Jill Murphy, North Dakota State University Extension agriculture and natural resources agent for Traill County, estimated that 2022 corn yields will be slightly above or slightly below the long-term average.
U.S. corn and soybean supplies will fall to multi-year lows as hot and dry weather during August in western growing areas cut into the harvest potential for both crops, the government said on Monday.
While farmer John Swanson's biggest fear is cold, the biggest need for his corn crop in northwest Minnesota is heat to bring the crop to maturity. After the late planting of 2022, the growing season has mostly cooperated, he said on the Agweek Crop Tour.

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Agronomist Logan Reuman of Presho, South Dakota, discusses the state of the corn crop on Aug. 18, 2022, north of Interstate Highway 90, near Presho, South Dakota, on the Agweek Corn and Soybean Tour. That part of the state has had good moisture, temperature and pollination.
Corn acres in Wyndmere, North Dakota, are holding steady despite the late planting and the current need for moisture, according to a stop on the Agweek Crop Tour.
The prospect of a web of pipelines to carry excess carbon dioxide from ethanol plants in the Midwest to a permanent burial field in North Dakota has the corn ethanol industry excited but landowners and farmers worried.

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