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CATTLE

The deaths add pain to the U.S. cattle industry as producers have reduced herds due to drought and grappled with feed costs that climbed as Russia's invasion of Ukraine tightened global grain supplies.
Cattle producers who lost calves in the April 2022 snow storms -- especially in western North Dakota where drought or dry conditions persist -- say the government's Livestock Indemnity Program needs update its funding formula and rules if partial compensation will be relevant.
Pete and Vawnita Best's road to ranching in the Badlands began more than 200 miles from there when Pete was a 14-year-old 4-H member living in Rolette, North Dakota, and selected a heifer from McCumber Angus Ranch for a livestock project.
The Leingang family of St. Anthony, North Dakota explains how their cattle and crop farm-ranch operation weathered the April blizzards and how planting season has been delayed, but buoyed because of the resulting moisture.

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These weather conditions could pose serious future health problems for calves that hit the ground during the blizzard or those who were a few days old when the blizzard came through.
Sen. Kevin Cramer has asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture to raise the assistance level for newborn calves under the Farm Service Agency's Livestock Indemnity Program and to look into “whether the weight categories under LIP should be reexamined.”
The moisture from two late April storms was needed, but also has caused problems for farmers and ranchers.
The U.S. Senate Agriculture Committee on April 26, 2022, tackled longstanding cattle pricing issues in a hearing over a price transparency bill and another that would increase Congress power to stop anti-competitive practices
A series of storms brought around 4 feet of snow to some parts of the region. While the storm and its aftermath continue to stress ranchers and cattle, there is optimism that it spells the beginning of the end of a dry cycle.
Ranchers in the midst of calving season were hit with a strong spring blizzard recently, and more adverse conditions may be on the way.

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Blizzard conditions moved through most of North Dakota, as well as parts of Montana, South Dakota and Minnesota April 12-14, 2022. Ranchers in the area, many of whom are deep into calving season, prepared as best they could to protect their animals.
Bina Charolais near Lawton, North Dakota, in northwest Walsh County has been raising white Charolais since 1979 and red Charolais since 2005 on the farm that Lane’s great-great-grandparents Vavrina and Katerina homesteaded in 1896.
Four Hill Farms knows the importance of diversification and did so to their farming operation in 2010.

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