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AGWEEKTV

The North Dakota Soybean Processors plant at Casselton and the Green Bison plant at Spiritwood are signs of the growing demand for renewable fuel as well as feed for the livestock industry.
This week on AgweekTV, we'll take a closer look at the future of soybean crushing in North Dakota with two big plants on the horizon. We'll visit the southern Red River Valley, where corn planting is finally getting started. We'll begin our "Follow A Farmer" series once again, where we'll meet a 22-year-old ag engineering graduate who's beginning her career as a full-time farmer. And a well-known group that helps farmers in need is at the mercy of Mother Nature.
Rather than a hot, dry summer, StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler says the excessively wet spring in the northern Plains — and North Dakota in particular — may mean the region will end up with a warm, wet beginning of summer. Wheeler's agriweather forecast discusses the impact of all the moisture on the continuing weather pattern.
Quaal Dairy in Otter Tail County sold off most of its herd in April. Vernon Quaal says the 2021 drought drastically cut into its feed supply and the rising prices for feed made maintaining the 300 cow herd unstainable. Quaal says many dairies are suffering. But he is determined to build back up, with a crop of bred heifers ready to calve in September.

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Anne Waltner, Parker, South Dakota, left a full-time career as a concert pianist and educator to join her parents’ farming operation. Along the way she married, had triplet daughters and survived cancer. Of her journey and life, she says: “Can you think of anybody luckier than me?”
This week on AgweekTV, cool wet weather continues to keep farmers out of the fields. We learn about a dairy farm in northwest Minnesota that is struggling to bounce back after the drought of 2021. We'll meet a South Dakota farmer with an unusual musical and family collaboration. And we'll take you to a Minnesota house made from a grain bin.
StormTRACKER meteorologist John Wheeler explains how the current pattern of seasonally warm days followed by rain is likely to continue for the time being on this week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast.
The wet cool spring looks like to continue for the northern and central Plains, while other parts of the Midwest appear to be in for a nice warm up, StormTRACKER meteorologist Jared Piepenburg says on this week's AgweekTV agriweather forecast.
This week on AgweekTV, the cold, wet spring may mean more prevented plant acres this year. Grand Farm announces its new permanent location for its Innovation Center. A Minnesota FFA chapter is being nationally recognized for its work on mental health. And we'll visit a Suffolk sheep farm that's bringing the pasture right to your pizza.
Wolff's Suffolks has been in the Suffolk industry for over 40 years. But recently, the ranch decided to diversify and sell their lamb to consumers and restaurants.

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Jared Goplen, a farmer and University of Minnesota Extension educator on crops and forage, is seeing more interest in small grains in traditional corn and soybean country for a few reasons: soil health, weed and pest management, and benefits to livestock operations.
This week on AgweekTV, spring flooding is taking a toll on parts of our region. We're in western Minnesota, where spring planting has started with a few acres of wheat. We'll tell you about how an ag finance career led to a maple syrup business. And we examine if the abnormal snow and cold could have long-term effects on calves born this spring.
These weather conditions could pose serious future health problems for calves that hit the ground during the blizzard or those who were a few days old when the blizzard came through.

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