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AGWEEK CROP TOUR

Northeast South Dakota cereal crops were looking good in late July 2022 for the Agweek Cereal Crop Tour, but high winds and hot temperatures raised concerns for crops that started three weeks late and are three weeks behind in development during a critical head-filling time. The tour focused on condition sat the Northeast Research Station for South Dakota State University, at South Shore, S.D.
Jamie Schurhamer, speaking on the Agweek Cereals Crop Tour on July 21, said there were early concerns that 2022 could shape up to be like 2021. But widespread snow in the area eased some concerns, and now cereals crops in the area have high potential for solid yields.
The Wheat Quality Council tour is led by some experts in the growing of wheat, but many of the participants are from other areas of the industry, such as milling and baking or promoting trade, and come to learn more about spring wheat and durum.
“There’s a lot of good looking wheat this year,” said Noel Anderson, sales agronomist for Agri-Max in Fisher, Minnesota, said on the Agweek Cereals Crop Tour.

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The region got a late start to planting this year due to steady rainfall. Despite that, the cereal crop in the Casselton, North Dakota, area is still looking strong, according to this stop on the Agweek Crop Tour.
Jochum Wiersma, University of Minnesota Extension agronomist, said on the Agweek Cereals Crop Tour the wheat that was planted in the last two weeks of May is well-tillered, with decent head size and clean canopies, with very few aphids to be found.
As part of Agweek Cereals Crop Tour, a visit to a Thompson, North Dakota, test plot looks at this year's late-planted crop.
According to University of Minnesota Extension Educator Michael Cruse, there are a lot of weed issues on the edges of fields in southeast Minnesota.
Central and north central South Dakota crop areas have suffered, but even in the southeast, Yankton County had one of the driest summers on record. Meanwhile the far southeast caught some timely rains and could have a bumper crop.
The corn and soybean fields in Hawley, Minnesota, were a few of the lucky acres in the region to receive the elusive, yet much needed sporadic rain showers.

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Dorian Gatchell, owner of Minnesota Agriculture Services of Granite Falls, Minnesota, discusses status of the corn and soybean crop after dry summer. He thinks strip-tillage systems can help row crop farmers to adapt to both excessive wet and dry seasons.
Spence Koenig of Direct Ag Supply of Mandan, North Dakota, says corn under pivots in his territory from Mandan to the southwest looks good and could go 180 to 200 bushels. But with only about 5% of the corn irrigated, it's a big loss for most of the acres
Crop Consultant Jason Fussy of Willmar, Minnesota, who works for Centrol of Marshall, Minnesota, in an interview for the Agweek Corn and Soybean Tour 2021, gives the overall corn and soybean crop a “B-minus” but calls it extremely variable, after a summer of excessive heat and drought or spotty rains.

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