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AGWEEK SPECIAL REPORTS

John Deere has 75,000 employees worldwide. Just 30 of them have been named John Deere Fellows of Excellence, and five of those 30 are in Fargo at the Intelligent Solutions Group.
In the northern regions, not much grows in the dead of winter. But our Future of Food series learned more about vegetable production in the winter in southeast Minnesota, and we shared on AgweekTV.
Research going on at cooperating universities throughout the country will work to identify feed and water efficient cattle, which could mean big savings for producers and for the environment.
Some people who can't eat regular breads without digestive problems can eat sourdough breads and breads made in Europe or Asia. But why? Researchers are trying to figure that out.

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Deere & Company has one of its worldwide research technology hubs in Fargo, North Dakota -- a big part of the fabled company’s “brain.”
Five John Deere engineers in Fargo, North Dakota, have been named elite “Fellows” by the company, honoring their contributions.
The University of Minnesota has been researching the effects of dough fermentation and wheat variety in creating bread that is easier to digest.
West Virginia University for about 20 years has been working on tracking feed and water intake of animals. What they've learned is some cattle have traits that make them more efficient than others.
Researcher's technological tools include genome markers, robots and drones.
Needing to secure its own cold chain, JonnyPops develops Vortex Cold Storage at Albert Lea, Minnesota.

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From a 50-acre greenhouse to a 40-by-8 shipping container, growers across the region are using technology and ingenuity to keep fresh greens on the table year-round.
Demand has boosted prices for some crops, which include field peas, oats and canola, grown in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota on varying numbers of acres.
Jayson Lusk, a distinguished professor and head of the Agricultural Economics Department at Purdue University in Indiana, has some ideas where the future of food and agriculture is headed.

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