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WILDLIFE

Bryan and Bryce Sombke, who promote a 500-acre natural bird hunting and gun dog enterprise near Conde, South Dakota, and help on the family’s 2,000-acre farm, were among those hit in an unusual Aug. 28, 2021, hail storm. The storm brought high winds and softball-sized hail, and killed deer and decimated the bird population, as well as flattening 7- to 8-foot-tall corn and Conservation Reserve Program lands.
"I thought it was a German shepherd or a husky," the driver said. "I was petting it."
For years, as California's Central Valley grew into the nation's leading agricultural corridor, the region gradually lost almost all of the wetlands that birds, from the tiny sandpiper to the great blue heron, depend on during their migrations along the West Coast.
A great horned owl can take down prey larger than itself: Skunks, wild turkeys, the occasional cat. Its sharp and powerful talons can crush its chosen dinner.

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JAMESTOWN, N.D. -- When people think of precision agriculture, they often think of autosteer, variable-rate seeding, satellites or drones. But when Ryan Heiniger heard about AgSolver's Profit Zone Manager, he thought of conservation. It was 2015 ...
GRAND FORKS-Raccoons displaying odd behavior symptomatic of distemper have been reported by homeowners near Larimore, N.D., and while nothing has been confirmed, the reports are a good reminder for people to make sure their dogs and other pets ar...
A joint effort between Ducks Unlimited, South Dakota State University, South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks and the Natural Resources Conservation Service is helping farmers create a better habitat for wildlife in eastern South Dakota.
Walsh County, N.D. --The Walsh County sheriff's department is warning the public about a bear spotted in the area. The pictures above are of the bear taken Wednesday, May 17, around 9 p.m. The bear was at a farmyard just east of Park River. Autho...
A little-known branch of the federal government charged with getting rid of unwanted and invasive pests killed 2.7 million animals in 2016, the agency's annual report shows.
Editor's Note: This story was originally published on March 6, 2017.

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SALMON, Idaho -- Wildlife advocates are ramping up their campaign against the annual culling of bison that roam onto state lands in Montana each winter from Yellowstone National Park, erecting dramatic billboards showing buffalo bleeding in the snow. The billboards are the latest effort in an ongoing campaign by opponents of a years-long practice aimed at reducing the number of Yellowstone’s bison to protect against disease transmission and lessen the damage to land in and around the park, which spans parts of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho. This year, wildlife managers aim to reduce the herd by up to 1,300 animals, the largest amount in nearly a decade. “We’re fine with bison being hunted," Michael Garrity, executive director of the Alliance for the Wild Rockies, the Montana-based conservation group behind the billboard campaign, said in a telephone interview on Friday. "But this is mass slaughter.” His group is urging the state’s Democratic governor, Steve Bullock, to stop bison destined for slaughter from being trucked through the state. The outsized road signs, painted by a Montana artist and bison activist, depict fallen bison with blood drenching snow and the words, in capital letters, “Stop the Yellowstone massacre!” Two billboards went up this week and two more are slated to go up later this month.
CALGARY, Alberta-Rangers have successfully reintroduced a herd of plains bison to Canada's oldest national park, officials said on Monday, Feb. 6, more than 130 years after the iconic North American animal last grazed the eastern slopes of the Ca...
BEMIDJI, Minn. - Officials from the Department of Natural Resources met with Bemidji area residents Wednesday as part of a new initiative to create a long-term deer management strategy based on public input.The format of the meeting, and others l...

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