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RED RIVER VALLEY

The Red River Valley Water Supply Project will sue farmland owners for eminent domain if they don’t sign easements before July 8, 2022. Farmers say the project is paying one-tenth what others pay for far smaller oil, gas and water pipelines.
The North Dakota Attorney General’s office is asking Red River Trust, a Washington-based entity with offices in the Kansas City, Kansas, area, and an address at Grafton, North Dakota, to prove that it doesn’t violate anti-corporate farming laws, which would require it to sell land it purchased from owners of Campbell Farms of Grafton.
In a year with high commodity prices and high fertilizer prices, Larry Linneman, a farmer near Reynolds, North Dakota, explains why he made the unprecedented choice to pull a wheat seeding rig with two tractors. Prevented-planting insurance won’t pay what crops will pay, and it’s hard to watch expensive fertilizer leach away. Rotations with sugarbeets are an issue.
Fall rains and winter snows allowed some areas of the Red River Valley to escape drought, while others remain abnormally dry or in drought.

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The Hall family partnership of Hoople, North Dakota, on Oct. 25, 2021, put in place a multi-million-dollar optical grading system plant that uses cameras to evaluate potatoes individually and sort them into lanes. The Halls’ Spectrim can sort up to 1,700 potatoes a minute or around 120,000 per hour.
Beet sugar production efficiencies have increased significantly said Dirk Swart, executive vice president of United Sugars Corp., of Edina, Minnesota, speaking Dec. 2, 2021, at the American Crystal Sugar Co., annual meeting in Fargo, North Dakota. Photo taken Dec. 2, 2021, at Fargo, North Dakota.
Sugarbeet harvest plays a large role in the Red River Valley's agriculture industry. Due to the harvest being non-stop once the campaign begins, many local businesses extend their hours in an effort to rally behind sugarbeet producers.
In North Dakota, the condition of the potato crop for the week that ended Sunday, Sept. 19, was 4% very poor, 16% poor, 63% fair, 5% good and 2% excellent, according to National Agricultural Statistics-North Dakota. In Minnesota, the condition of the potato crop for the week ending Sunday, Sept. 19, was 2% very poor, 5% poor, 20% fair, 43% good, and 30% excellent, according to National Agricultural Statistics-Minnesota.
Sugarbeet harvest in the Red River Valley is an around the clock operation, requiring a multitude of seasonal workers to get the job done.
The condition of North Dakota potatoes, which includes processing and fresh stock, in the week that ended Sunday, Aug. 23, was 8% very poor, 14% poor and 63% fair, National Agricultural Statistics-North Dakota said. The agency rated only 13% of the crop good, and 2% excellent.

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Near Climax, Minnesota, a small crack in the ground has grown, causing a quarter-mile long stretch of bean field to fall 25 feet. Few have ever seen anything like it.
Farmers in the southern Red River Valley who experienced drought conditions a month ago, along with 50 mph winds, now have gotten a shot of rain. Soils that moved also moved weed seed, which can contaminate neighboring fields with tough-to-control waterhemp. A return to hot, dry conditions makes those weeds even harder to control.
American Crystal Sugar Co.’s political action committee says it will continue supporting candidates important to agricultural policy considerations and won’t base decisions based on one vote to accept or reject Electoral College votes in the presidential race.

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