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We're thankful for ag 24/7/365

In this modern day and age, people have become so far removed from agriculture. They know very little about where their food comes from and that there are many, many more people to thank for getting that food to their tables than their local grocers.

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In this modern day and age, people have become so far removed from agriculture. They know very little about where their food comes from and that there are many, many more people to thank for getting that food to their tables than their local grocers.

We are thankful for producers and their families. Everyone chips in on a working farm or ranch - they are all-in-it-for-everyone operations, in the rain, sun, snow, wind, heat, cold and anything else Mother Nature throws at 'em. It's not just their livelihoods. It's their lives.

We're thankful for friends and neighbors who know what it's like and who help in good times and bad. And in the worst of times, for FarmAid and others like it and the people who volunteer their time and labor to make the best of a really bad situation.

We're thankful for the feed 'n' seeds, implement dealers and others who stock what's needed to put the crops in the ground and to nurture and harvest them. We're thankful for the machine shops that put stuff back together more times than you'd think was possible, and still have it do its job.

We're thankful for the veterinarians who help keep herds healthy. Just like the producers they work with, they spend a LOT of time in mud and manure. And, unlike most medical doctors, they still make house - OK, ranch - calls.

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We're thankful for resources like the Extension offices, soil conservation districts and the Farm Service Agency. The people who work at these agencies offer all kinds of information, new technologies and boots-on-the-ground experience to help ag operations get the most they can out of what they have to work with.

We're thankful for elevators, trucks and trains and the people who operate them, to get what's produced from the fields to the next step in the food chain.

And let's not forget the 4-H and FFA organizations - we're thankful for these programs and the leaders and advisors who help our children prepare for careers in agriculture. We're thankful for ag education instructors who help our kids prepare for lives in ag careers.

We're even thankful for the weather, no matter how much we complain about it. When the summer has been dry, those nasty gazillion-foot-deep snowdrifts will melt - temperature and soil conditions willing - to fill stock ponds and provide the moisture needed for the new year's crops.

We're thankful for all the lessons learned and the opportunities presented; the humor, headaches and heartaches and so much more. In ag communities, a handshake is the same as a written contract, animals are unpredictable and small children sliding off barn roofs may get swallowed up by the snowbank below.

We're thankful for friends and neighbors who offer listening ears, hot coffee and help when we need it. We're thankful for our quirky senses of humor that save the day when things go wrong - and they WILL go wrong, usually at the most inopportune times.

We're thankful we get to share these things with you and hope you share our passion for rural life and enjoy laughing with us.

And, most importantly, we're thankful for all of these things every day of the year - not just during the holidays. Happy Thanksgiving!

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Annette Tait & Katy "Kate" Kassian

Related Topics: FARMING
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