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While Agweek is based in the northern Plains and upper Midwest, the news we report is strongly tied to agriculture across the country. If you grow corn or soybeans or raise cattle, there is news for you in Agweek. If you are looking for new ideas on how to keep your farm in the black or you're wondering how policy decisions in D.C. impact you, there is news for you in Agweek.

The top of a sugarbeet sticks out of the ground, with the foliage above it.
Agweek brings you Sugarbeet Grower Magazine, but our reporting expands far beyond sugarbeets.
Mikkel Pates / Agweek file photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

In Sugarbeet Grower Magazine, we cover sugarbeets. We cover the industry, the farmers, the policies. We look at research, diseases and technologies and all the things that can impact your sugarbeet operation.

But we know that sugarbeets aren't your sole focus on your farm.

For more than a year, Sugarbeet Grower Magazine has been brought to your mailboxes by Agweek. And at Agweek, we cover the rest of the news and information you need for your operation, along with sugarbeets.

Agweek got its start in 1985 with a strong focus on news and market information that you couldn't, at that time, get anywhere else in the northern Plains. Over the decades, our focus has remained on giving farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses information you won't find in any other news source.

We go beyond just disseminating press releases and reporting inch-deep news that you'll find elsewhere. We have experienced reporters, most of whom have personal backgrounds in agriculture, who can put ag news into perspective. We also have a variety of contributors who can broaden your perspective and give you ideas on topics like farm finances, succession planning and markets.

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Jenny Schlecht
Jenny Schlecht

While Agweek is based in the northern Plains and upper Midwest, the news we report is strongly tied to agriculture across the country. If you grow corn or soybeans or raise cattle, there is news for you in Agweek. If you are looking for new ideas on how to keep your farm in the black or you're wondering how policy decisions in D.C. impact you, there is news for you in Agweek.

If you're interested in the business of agriculture, visit https://www.agweek.com/subscribe to learn about options for getting your ag news from Agweek, whether that's in our weekly printed magazine or on our website, where you also can watch episodes of AgweekTV, our award-winning weekly agriculture show, from wherever you are. Visit https://www.agweek.com/newsletter to sign up for our email newsletters, including our Sugarbeet Grower newsletter. The vital reporting our team does isn't possible without the support of subscriptions.

We hope you'll join us!

Jenny Schlecht is the editor of Agweek and Sugarbeet Grower Magazine. She lives on a farm and ranch in Medina, North Dakota, with her husband and two daughters. She can be reached at jschlecht@agweek.com or 701-595-0425.

Jenny Schlecht is the editor of Agweek and Sugarbeet Grower Magazine. She lives on a farm and ranch near Medina, North Dakota, with her husband and two daughters. You can reach her at jschlecht@agweek.com or 701-595-0425.
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