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Ag Right: It’s alive! (Easy as pie)

This spring, I wrote about transplanting a 120-year-old rhubarb plant on my family farm in central North Dakota. Some readers, tickled by the existance of such an old plant, have asked me how it's doing. I'm happy to report it's faring just fine....

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This spring, I wrote about transplanting a 120-year-old rhubarb plant on my family farm in central North Dakota. Some readers, tickled by the existance of such an old plant, have asked me how it’s doing. I’m happy to report it’s faring just fine. Rhubarb is tough; even I couldn’t mess up transplanting it. (Especially not with my 80-year-old father, who has transplanted rhubarb in the past, giving me excellent advice.)

I’ve also writted about the annual summer hunt for wild juneberries on our farm. Most of the plants have been lost to chemical drift, and the few that remain seldom produce meaningful amounts of this wonderful berry that’s similiar to, but better than, blueberries. I’m happy to report this year’s wild juneberry crop was terrific, with the pickings used for pie. No doubt skilled bakers will be unimpressed by the crust, but, hey, it tastes great.

It’s been such a strange summer in much of Agweek country. Way too wet in places, way too dry in others. Successfully transplanted rhubarb and wild juneberry pie rank low in the grand scheme of things. But like most other aggies, I take satisfaction in the little things.

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Mikkel Pates set the standard for agricultural journalism during his 44-year career in the region, working for Agweek, The Forum and the Worthington Globe.
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