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A day on horseback

I seriously live the best life. I'm fortunate enough to spend most days doing whatever I want. Some days, what I want to do and what I get to do are different. A couple of years ago, we had a "must-do" job -- we needed to move a bull from the pas...

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The horseback view of the pasture was breathtaking.(Jenn Zeller/Special to Agweek)

I seriously live the best life.

I'm fortunate enough to spend most days doing whatever I want.

Some days, what I want to do and what I get to do are different. A couple of years ago, we had a "must-do" job - we needed to move a bull from the pasture with our first calf heifers to the pasture with our cows.

My cousin Burt and I loaded our horses, a couple of panels and headed out to sort off one of our handsome Brangus bulls. We needed to load him into the trailer, then haul him to his new pasture.

Loading him was pretty much a piece of cake, though it also involved the cow kind of cake! I swear that stuff is like crack for cows. Plus, all of our bulls are gentle and will eat it out of your hand.

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So all we had to do was trail him about 200 feet into the makeshift corral by the trailer, jump in shake a bucket full of cake at him, throw him a piece or two and he was like, "Girls? What girls? There's cake to be eaten, boys!"

After we got him loaded, we jumped our horses in the back of the trailer, put our panels back on the side, and headed to a river pasture to find the cows and dump him out.

Once there, we needed to trail him down to the cows. We rode through that pasture and once I reached top of the biggest hill on the ranch, the view was a sight to behold.

I didn't eat lunch until about 3 p.m. that day, because once I covered two thirds of the pasture from the top (Burt rode the river bottoms), I trotted Dino the 4 miles home while Burt covered the rest of the pasture and brought the trailer home. I was just unsaddling when he pulled in.

It was a lovely day to be horseback (but aren't all days?) doing a job. I'm grateful I get to do these of things!

And that, my friends, is just another day in my life.

Happy trails!

Related Topics: CATTLE
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