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Weather Talk: We'll need more rain to stay green

Apart from the wind damage, that was a nice rain Tuesday. However, this rain was not an end-all rain, by any means. The 1-2 inches most areas got will green the grass a bit and stave off major concern about a summer drought. But unless it rains s...

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Jenny Schlecht/Agweek

Apart from the wind damage, that was a nice rain Tuesday. However, this rain was not an end-all rain, by any means.

The 1-2 inches most areas got will green the grass a bit and stave off major concern about a summer drought. But unless it rains substantially again in the next week or two, our region will be wanting for rain again.

Since the rainy period began in 1993, most of us have become accustomed to heavy rainfall during May, June, and July. It rains an inch or two and then, a couple of days later, another inch or two. This year, rainfall has been scant and this was really our first significant soaking.

As long as the weather remains fairly cool, yards and crops will thrive on this week’s rain. But we will need rain again soon. Should the weather become hot in July, we will need a lot of rain or else yards and fields will go back to the color ranges (brown) of the 1980s.

Related Topics: DROUGHT
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