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Weather Talk: Some birds stay north in winter

Have you seen any robins lately? It is quite possible that you have. Of course, most of our spring and summer robins head south for the winter; taking their cheerful, after-the-rain-song with them. Most sensible robins go in search of places wher...

Courtney Sletten jumps a slush puddle
Forum News Service file photo.

Have you seen any robins lately? It is quite possible that you have. Of course, most of our spring and summer robins head south for the winter; taking their cheerful, after-the-rain-song with them. Most sensible robins go in search of places where they can warmly feast on worms all winter. But every winter, a few robins do stay over the winter right here in Fargo Moorhead, where worms go deep down under the frost. Robins can survive our cold winters by fluffing their feathers for insulation. They can create extra heat by deliberately shivering. You are not likely to see them hanging around your bird feeders because robins do not eat seeds. When worms are not available, robins eat wild berries such as mountain ash, crabapples, bittersweet, bayberries, and chokecherries. If you are desperate to see a robin this winter, you might try leaving out raisins, currents, cranberries, or apple pieces on a small platform or in your regular feeder.   

 

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