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Weather Talk: Explaining the unexplainable

At least once a week, and sometimes more often, I am asked by someone to explain some sort of "unexplainable" phenomenon. Usually, the thing (picture or story about something in the weather or, at least, in the sky) is presented with great confid...

At least once a week, and sometimes more often, I am asked by someone to explain some sort of “unexplainable” phenomenon. Usually, the thing (picture or story about something in the weather or, at least, in the sky) is presented with great confidence that it is, in fact, unexplainable. I find that there is virtually always a plausible explanation for almost any of these weird, “unexplainable” things. Sometimes the person is satisfied with the explanation and sometimes not. The difference is usually in the disposition of the person. Some people prefer fantastic explanations for things. Government conspiracies, aliens, and spirits may satisfy some people’s curiosity about the world but I will always prefer a simpler explanation. The Ancients were frightened by eclipse.  But light, shadow, and a little bit of geometry can explain an eclipse to almost anyone. Most things work this way.  Instead of explaining the fantastic with something super fantastic, look instead for the simple solution.   

 

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