ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Weather Talk: Dustiest places on Earth

It has been dry enough this fall that last weekend's big winds caused dust storms. Dust storms are common here in periods of dry weather, but we have been generally wet since 1993. But seeing dust in the air got me thinking about the driest place...

John Wheeler

It has been dry enough this fall that last weekend’s big winds caused dust storms. Dust storms are common here in periods of dry weather, but we have been generally wet since 1993. But seeing dust in the air got me thinking about the driest places on Earth.

According to Livescience.com, the third driest place is Al-Kufrah, Libya, in the northern Sahara, with an average annual rainfall of 0.03 inches per year. The second driest location is near Arica, Chili, also with an annual rainfall of 0.03 inches. It is estimated that some of the surrounding Atacama Desert has not had rainfall in 500 years. But the driest places on Earth are the so-called “Dry Valleys” of Antarctica where the average annual precipitation is zero. The Dry Valleys are so dry they are barren of snow even though it never thaws there. At times, katabatic winds of more than 100 mph blow down from nearby mountains, causing extreme evaporation. 

 

Related Topics: JOHN WHEELERWEATHERTALK
What To Read Next
Students at the college in Wahpeton, North Dakota, will be able to get two-year applied science degrees in precision agronomy and precision agriculture technician starting in the fall of 2023.
Researchers with North Dakota State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are working to see if a particular variety of Lewis flax has the potential to be a useful crop.
No one was seriously injured when the top exploded off the silo because of built-up gasses from the burning corn.
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.