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Weather Talk: Anderson Creek fire

In what may well be the largest grass fire in Kansas in recorded history, the Anderson Creek fire has now burned more than 600 square miles in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma. The fire started last week in northwestern Oklahoma and spread quickly in...

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The Anderson Creek Fire near Medicine Lodge, Kan. REUTERS/U.S. Army National Guard/Sgt. Zachary Sheely/Handout via Reuters
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In what may well be the largest grass fire in Kansas in recorded history, the Anderson Creek fire has now burned more than 600 square miles in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma. The fire started last week in northwestern Oklahoma and spread quickly into Kansas. This region is mostly cattle grazing land and the number of cattle lost is not known. Hundreds of miles of fencing has also been burned, which will take months to replace. Spring is usually the peak of grass fire conditions when warm, windy days with low humidity are common. This spring, the lack of rain this spring has produced extremely dry conditions, leading to this unusually large fire. The Kansas National Guard brought in Blackhawk helicopters to dump huge buckets of water onto the fire over the weekend, helping to bring it under control. 

 

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