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Vilsack responds to TPP study

U.S. Agriculture Secretary says a new study from the International Trade Commission reconfirms that the Trans Pacific Partnership would be good for U.S. ag.

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U.S. Agriculture Secretary says a new study from the International Trade Commission reconfirms that the Trans Pacific Partnership would be good for U.S. ag.

The  “ITC report echoes what every major reputable study on TPP has now found, from the Petersen Institute to the American Farm Bureau Foundation, which is that TPP will provide strong benefits for the U.S. agriculture sector, with agricultural output set to be $10 billion higher per year by 2032 than it would without the agreement,” Vilsack says in a news release.

“Agricultural exports drive 20 percent of U.S. farm income and trade is critical not only to the continued growth of not only the sector, but to rural communities at large,” he says.

The TPO, as it’s commonly called in ag circles, would lower barriers to U.S. exports to Japan and other countries. Agriculture and food would be the biggest winner in the deal, according to the ITC.

Negotiators have approved the TPP, but Congress still must ratify it.

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