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VIDEO: Beekeeping is all the buzz in New York City

High above the concrete jungle of New York City, there is a hive of activity you have to see to believe --- as beekeepers tend to their nest of honey bees.

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High above the concrete jungle of New York City, there is a hive of activity you have to see to believe --- as beekeepers tend to their nest of honey bees.

Urban beekeeper Andrew Cote says the bee population in Manhattan is literally soaring.

"Here in New York City we have limited real estate options, and rooftops are generally unused and make for wonderful places to put our bees. They make for fantastic apiaries."

This beehive on the 76th floor rooftop of the Residence Inn hotel near Central Park hosts six hives with about 180,000 honey bees - and just might be the highest apiary in the world.

There has been a lot of buzz surrounding beekeeping, since New York City legalized it in 2010.

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And now, there are nearly 300 registered hives in the city - according to the Department ofHealth.

And naturally, the honey they produce is sold locally - and sales are sweet.

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