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USDA Crop Progress report shows slight declines in corn, soybean conditions

The Crop Progress report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service released Tuesday, June 21, 2022 for the week ending June 19.

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A field of corn near Moorhead, Minnesota, on Monday, June 21.
Jeff Beach / Agweek
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WASHINGTON — The weekly U.S. Crop Progress report showed small declines for corn and soybeans.

The Crop Progress report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service was released Tuesday, June 21, for the week ending June 19, delayed a day from its normal Monday release because of the Juneteenth holiday.

The overall corn crop declined a bit in condition with 13% of the crop rated excellent but 57% rated good; down 2% from the previous week.

On soybeans, North Dakota was up 92% planted, not far off the five-year average of 98%; and South Dakota was ahead of the five-year average at 98% planted.

Overall, soybeans were 58% good and 10% excellent, down 1% in each category.

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Small grains generally showed improvement, even in Montana but the crop there still is struggling with 21% in poor or very poor condition.

Some of the recent high heat came after data was collected and may show up in the next report.

Here are key figures for the Upper Midwest from this week's report , with figures as of June 19 and few more Tweets from producers:

Corn

Iowa: 98% emerged. Condition: 2% poor; 15% fair; 65% good; 18% excellent

Minnesota: 97% emerged. Condition: 1% very poor; 2% poor, 32% fair; 53% good; 12% excellent

North Dakota: 68% emerged (down from usual 93%). Condition: 2% poor, 30% fair; 60% good; 9% excellent

South Dakota: 96% emerged. Condition: 2% poor, 19% fair; 68% good; 11% excellent

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Soybeans

Iowa: 99% planted, 93% emerged. Condition: 1% very poor; 2% poor; 17% fair; 64% good; 16% excellent

Minnesota: 97% planted, 83% emerged. Condition: 1% very poor; 2% poor; 33% fair; 57% good; 7% excellent

North Dakota: 92% planted, 58% emerged (down from usual 86%). Condition: 3% poor; 39% fair; 52% good; 6% excellent

South Dakota: 98% planted, 82% emerged. Condition: 1% very poor; 3% poor; 25% fair; 68% good; 4% excellent

Sunflowers

North Dakota: 83% planted.

South Dakota: 83% planted.

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Spring wheat

Minnesota: 98% planted; 93% emerged. Condition: 1% poor; 35% fair; 57% good; 7% excellent

Montana: 100% planted; 98% emerged. Condition: 5% very poor; 16% poor; 54% fair; 24% good; 1% excellent

North Dakota: 97% planted; 80% emerged. Condition: 29% fair; 62% good; 9% excellent

South Dakota: 100% planted; 98% emerged. Condition: 1% very poor; 9% poor; 24% fair; 58% good; 8% excellent

Barley

Minnesota: 85% emerged. Condition: 1% poor; 40% fair; 53% good; 6% excellent.

Montana: 98% emerged, 5% headed. Condition: 10% very poor; 30% poor; 38% fair; 20% good; 2% excellent.

North Dakota: 88% emerged. Condition: 25% fair; 70% good; 5% excellent.

Oats

Iowa: 99% emerged, 62% headed. Condition: 1% poor; 17% fair; 65% good; 17% excellent.

Minnesota: 92% emerged, 4% headed. Condition: 1% very poor; 1% poor; 29% fair; 60% good; 9% excellent.

North Dakota: 91% emerged. Condition: 1% poor; 16% fair; 79% good; 4% excellent.

South Dakota: 95% emerged, 35% headed. Condition: 1% very poor; 8% poor; 31% fair; 53% good; 7% excellent.

Winter wheat

South Dakota: Condition: 2% very poor; 22% poor; 41% fair; 24% good; 11% excellent.

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