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Upper Midwest crops stabilize

Crop conditions have stabilized in the drought-ravaged Upper Midwest, according to a new government report. Though drought remains a huge concern, crops aren't any worse off overall than they were a week earlier, according to the weekly crop prog...

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Crop conditions have stabilized in the drought-ravaged Upper Midwest, according to a new government report.

Though drought remains a huge concern, crops aren't any worse off overall than they were a week earlier, according to the weekly crop progress from the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The report, issued Aug. 7, reflects conditions on Aug. 6.

Corn reflects the overall stabilization in crop conditions.

In South Dakota, corn was rated 36 percent poor or very poor on Aug. 6, compared with 39 percent a week earlier.

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North Dakota's corn crop was in 25 percent poor or very poor condition, unchanged from a week earlier.

In Minnesota, corn was rated 4 percent or very poor, unchanged from the previous week.

Minnesota continues to avoid the worst of the drought hammering North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana.

To put those numbers in perspective, 13 percent of corn in the nation's 18 leading corn-producing states was rated poor or very poor, unchanged from the previous week.

Here's what the report say about spring wheat and soybeans, which along with wheat and corn, are the region's major crops:

Spring wheat

South Dakota - Seventy-five percent was in poor or very poor shape, unchanged from the previous week. Sixty-five percent was harvested, compared with 46 percent a week earlier.

Montana - Sixty-three percent was rated poor or very poor, compared with 58 percent a week earlier. Thirty-three percent was harvested, compared with 5 percent a week earlier.

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North Dakota - Forty percent was in poor or very poor condition, compared with 44 percent a week earlier. Sixteen percent was harvested, compared with 5 percent a week earlier.

Minnesota - Three percent was rated poor or very poor, compared with 1 percent a week earlier. Nine percent was harvested, compared with 3 percent a week earlier.

U.S. average (six leading spring wheat-producing states) - Forty-three percent was rated poor or very poor, unchanged from the previous week. Twenty-four percent was harvested, compared with nine percent a week earlier.

Soybeans

South Dakota - Twenty-nine percent was in poor or very poor condition, compared with 35 percent a week earlier.

North Dakota - Twenty-four percent was rated poor or very poor, unchanged from the previous week.

Minnesota - Five percent was in poor or very shape, compared with 6 percent a week earlier.

U.S. average (18 leading soybean-producing states) - Twelve percent was rated poor or very poor, compared with 13 percent a week earlier.

Related Topics: SOYBEANSCORNWHEAT
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