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U.S. private sector adds 200,000 jobs in March

NEW YORK - U.S. private employers added 200,000 jobs in March, above economists' expectations, a report by a payrolls processor showed on Wednesday. Economists surveyed by Reuters had forecast the ADP National Employment Report would show a gain ...

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Job seekers work on applications during a job hiring event for marketing, sales and retail positions in San Francisco. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

NEW YORK - U.S. private employers added 200,000 jobs in March, above economists' expectations, a report by a payrolls processor showed on Wednesday.

Economists surveyed by Reuters had forecast the ADP National Employment Report would show a gain of 194,000 jobs, with estimates ranging from 150,000 to 220,000.

Private payroll gains in the month earlier were revised down to 205,000 from an originally reported 214,000 increase.

The report is jointly developed with Moody's Analytics.

The ADP figures come ahead of the U.S. Labor Department's more comprehensive non-farmpayrolls report on Friday, which includes both public and private-sector employment.

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Economists polled by Reuters are looking for U.S. private payroll employment to have grown by 197,000 jobs in March, down from 230,000 the month before. Total non-farm employment is expected to be 205,000.

The unemployment rate is forecast to stay steady at 4.9 percent.

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