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North Dakota State University schedules sugarbeet growers seminars in February

Topics at the grower seminars include sugarbeet diseases, weeds and insect pests.

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North Dakota State University will host growers seminars for growers during February. This sugarbeet harvest photo was taken in October 2021 near Reynolds, N..D.
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North Dakota State University Extension will host its annual sugarbeet grower seminars in February.

The seminars will be held in the North Dakota cities of Grafton, Grand Forks, Fargo and Wahpeton between Feb. 1 and Feb. 17. Topics include sugarbeet diseases, weeds and insect pests.

During the seminars, University of Minnesota and NDSU sugarbeet specialists will speak. The following are the speakers and the topics they will cover:

  • Ashok Chanda, University of Minnesota Extension sugarbeet crop systems specialist: Management of Rhizoctonia damping-off and root rot of sugarbeets.
  • Mohamed Khan, NDSU and U of M Extension sugarbeet specialist: Strategies to manage cercospora leaf spot of sugarbeets.
  • Tom Peters, NDSU and U of M sugarbeet agronomist: A holistic and systems approach to manage weeds.
  • Mark Boetel, NDSU Extension entomologist: Recommendations on how to optimize insect pest control in sugarbeets.

The following are the dates, times and locations of the seminars:

  • Tuesday., Feb. 1 8:30 a.m., at the Alerus Center, Grand Forks, for American Crystal Sugar Co. growers in the East Grand Forks and Crookston factory districts.
  • Thursday., Feb., 3, 8:30 a.m., at the Holiday Inn, Fargo, for American Crystal Sugar Co. growers in the Moorhead and Hillsboro factory districts.
  • Thursday, Feb. 10, time and site to be determined for growers of Minn-Dak Farmers Cooperative in Wahpeton.
  • Thursday, Feb., 17: 8:30 a.m., at Frozen Fox, Grafton, for American Crystal Sugar Co. growers in the Drayton factory district.
Related Topics: SUGARBEETSNORTH DAKOTACROPS
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