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Six short pipelines to connect to DAPL

WILLISTON, N.D. - The timing of the Dakota Access Pipeline completion remains unclear, but some companies have built short pipelines that are ready to deliver to the four-state project.

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WILLISTON, N.D. - The timing of the Dakota Access Pipeline completion remains unclear, but some companies have built short pipelines that are ready to deliver to the four-state project.

Six companies have built or proposed short oil pipelines to connect with Dakota Access in North Dakota, with three projects constructed and three others in various stages. The pipelines would deliver oil from existing terminals or facilities in North Dakota directly to the Dakota Access Pipeline. With an initial capacity of 470,000 barrels per day, Dakota Access would become the Bakken’s largest oil pipeline, but the timing of the project remains uncertain as the federal government has yet to authorize construction under Lake Oahe.

The 1,172-mile pipeline would deliver Bakken crude to Patoka, Ill., where oil can then be transported by the Energy Transfer Crude Oil Pipeline to Texas, providing the first direct link for North Dakota crude to Gulf Coast refineries.

“We certainly think Dakota Access will be the interstate highway of Bakken oil and it’s critically important for the future of the Bakken,” said Ron Ness, president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council.

Construction is underway now for the Caliber Bear Den Interconnect pipeline, a 5.3-mile pipeline in McKenzie County the North Dakota Public Service Commission approved on Nov. 2. The $12 million project is expected to deliver 50,000 barrels per day to a Dakota Access terminal near Watford City, with a maximum capacity of 75,000 barrels per day.

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Construction was scheduled to begin last week and take about a month, according to documents filed with state regulators.

One Dakota Access connector, from a company with a large spill on its record, is still under consideration by the Public Service Commission.

Epping Transmission Co., a subsidiary of Summit Midstream Partners, proposes to build a 3.2-mile pipeline near Epping that would deliver 30,000 barrels a day, with a maximum capacity of 70,000 barrels per day. The $6.5 million project would have two separate pipeline connections, one to deliver oil to the Dakota Access Pipeline and the second to deliver oil to the existing Divide Mainline Pipeline.

A public hearing is scheduled for 9 a.m. Nov. 22 at the Ernie French Center, 14120 Highway 2, Williston.

Summit Midstream is the same company that owned the gathering pipeline that leaked nearly 3 million gallons of produced water north of Williston and contaminated Blacktail Creek, a Missouri River tributary. But the new proposed project would have a greater level of regulatory oversight than the produced water pipeline did when the spill was discovered in January 2015.

The other Dakota Access connector pipelines are:

› Oasis Midstream Services constructed 19 miles of pipelines to deliver oil to a terminal owned by Dakota Access at the pipeline storage hub known as Johnsons Corner in McKenzie County. The project also can deliver oil to a facility owned by Tesoro. The $13 million project has been 99 percent complete since September, according to a report filed with the Public Service Commission.

During a hearing for the project, an Oasis representative said the pipeline would transport up to 75,000 barrels per day, eliminating up to 250 trucks per day off the roads.

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› Hess North Dakota Export Logistics constructed a 1.1-mile pipeline near Tioga to deliver oil from the Ramberg Truck Facility to a Dakota Access terminal. The $4.5 million project is expected to transport 50,000 barrels per day, with a maximum capacity of 70,000 barrels per day. Construction was completed in October with commissioning to be completed when Dakota Access is ready for operation, according to a Hess spokesman.

› A 15-mile pipeline project by Sacagawea Pipeline Co. in McKenzie County included a 2-mile segment to connect with Dakota Access at the Johnsons Corner hub. The $20 million project is expected to transport 75,000 barrels per day.

That project has been listed as substantially complete since September, according to Public Service Commission records. Sacagawea Pipeline Co. is a joint business venture with Paradigm Energy Partners, Phillips 66 and Grey Wolf Midstream.

› The Public Service Commission also approved a 3.5-mile pipeline from Plains All American Pipeline that would deliver oil to Dakota Access at Johnsons Corner in McKenzie County. Construction has not begun on that project and nothing filed with state regulators indicates a timeline. A company representative could not be reached for comment.

The $5 million project proposed to deliver about 50,000 barrels per day, with a maximum capacity of 150,000 barrels per day.

Dakota Access constructed six oil storage terminals in North Dakota, with tanks located near Stanley, Tioga, Epping, Trenton, Watford City and Johnsons Corner. The Trenton terminal is planned to begin receiving oil on or around Tuesday, Nov. 15, according to a third-party inspector’s report filed with regulators.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is expected to announce “a path forward” for Dakota Access within days, according to statements made in federal court last week.

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