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SDSU Extension releases video resources for Artificial Insemination

BROOKINGS, S.D. - The popularity of artificial insemination as a reproduction management tool grows among South Dakota cattle producers grows each breeding season.

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BROOKINGS, S.D. - The popularity of artificial insemination as a reproduction management tool grows among South Dakota cattle producers grows each breeding season.

"Using AI allows ranchers to utilize highly proven sires that possess superior genetics," says Warren Rusche, SDSU Extension cow-calf field specialist.
A successful artificial insemination program, Rusche added is the result of many steps implemented correctly. "Just as a chain is only as strong as its weakest link, mistakes in any one area, such as insemination timing, semen handling or AI procedures, can result in reduced pregnancy rates," Rusche says.
He says an operations' success rate is further challenged because AI is typically only done for a few days a year on any one beef operation. "This can result in some of the skills becoming rusty."
Videos
To help cattle producers refresh their skills, SDSU Extension recently released two AI procedure videos, which can be found on the SDSU iGrow Channel on YouTube.
A link to the channel is available on iGrow.org.

Detection of Standing Estrus is the most recent release. This video discusses the primary and secondary signs of estrus in beef cattle and how changes in estrous detection rate can affect overall pregnancy rates. The second video is Semen Handling Procedures.

Related Topics: CATTLESOUTH DAKOTA
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