ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Poor Ivory Coast cocoa bean quality reduces purchases, exports

Purchases and exports of Ivory Coast cocoa beans fell sharply last week as a lack of rain and strong winds continued to reduce the quality of the crop, traders and farmers said on Tuesday.

2376340+X234_726D_9.JPG
Workers gather cocoa bags from trucks at SAF CACAO, an export firm in San-Pedro, Ivory Coast. REUTERS/Thierry Gouegnon

Purchases and exports of Ivory Coast cocoa beans fell sharply last week as a lack of rain and strong winds continued to reduce the quality of the crop, traders and farmers said on Tuesday.

Mills which process the beans reduced purchases by 70-80 percent last week, while traders said they bought up to 90 percent less, because the beans were too small and high in acidity, they said.

Sources in Cocoa Barry, Cargill, Sucden, Saf Cacao, Olam and Sourcing Africa said activity was reduced last week, in varing degrees.

Ivory Coast and Ghana's cocoa mid-crops are expected to fall sharply this season due to dry weather and the impact of a severe Harmattan wind on the world's top two growers, the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) said last month.

At the port of San Pedro, only a few trucks were allowed to unload their beans last week after analysis showed many were not fit for export.

ADVERTISEMENT

Usually during the main October to March season there are between 90-105 beans per 100 grammes. At the moment it is more like 125, making export impossible, sources said.

"We have closed our plant since last week because the grain count is too high. We cannot do anything, so it is better to wait to see if things change," said Ali Lakiss from Saf Cacao, the largest exporter of beans from San Pedro.

Last week, the Coffee and Cocoa Council had a meeting with exporters about the degradation of beans but no solution has been found.

What To Read Next
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.
The number of cows going to slaughter is far above the five-year average. Attendees of the annual Cow Calf Days tour in Minnesota heard the latest on cattle trends.
As Mikkel Pates approaches his retirement from Agweek after 44 years in journalism, he talks to Rose Dunn about learning TV, covering ag's characters and scandals and looking toward the future.
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.