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Nebraska behind on wind

LINCOLN -- Nebraska lags so far behind other states in development of its wind energy potential that it's embarrassing. New interest by two influential and powerful organizations in Nebraska has the potential to change that situation. The Nebrask...

LINCOLN -- Nebraska lags so far behind other states in development of its wind energy potential that it's embarrassing.

New interest by two influential and powerful organizations in Nebraska has the potential to change that situation.

The Nebraska Farm Bureau and Nebraska Cattlemen are members of the new Nebraska Energy Export Association led by Lincoln, Neb., businessman Tim Geisert.

The new organization's broad goals include coordinating partnerships between landowners, investors and lenders, and establishing relationships with quality developers.

Perhaps more importantly, it plans to seek legislative help to make Nebraska more attractive to investment in wind energy. The new wind energy association thinks that approach is not enough. The changes in Nebraska's public policy that it might seek are not yet clear. But there's little doubt that the group has considerable clout to get things done. Change is in the wind.

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