ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minn. protesters take aim at McDonald's, potato giant over water use, pesticides

ST. PAUL - A Minnesota-based group will lead a Tuesday protest against use of potatoes treated with pesticides. The Toxic Taters Coalition plans to hand out organic potatoes at nearly a dozen Minnesota McDonald's restaurants, as well as the chain...

ST. PAUL – A Minnesota-based group will lead a Tuesday protest against use of potatoes treated with pesticides.

The Toxic Taters Coalition plans to hand out organic potatoes at nearly a dozen Minnesota McDonald's restaurants, as well as the chain's stores in six other states and Canada.
The action is scheduled to coincide with the fast food chain's launch of its new all-day breakfast menu.

Toxic Taters is made up of a group of people who live near potato fields that they feel are treated too heavily with pest-killing chemicals. Also participating is the Pesticide Action Network North America.

The groups will tell McDonald's customers interested in the subject that people who live near fields where potatoes are grown for McDonald's French fries and hash browns are exposed to pesticides that drift from fields. The pesticides, the organizations say, hurt people's health.

In Minnesota, Toxic Taters will be outside McDonald's restaurants, mostly in the afternoon and evening, in Brainerd, Detroit Lakes, Duluth, Minneapolis, Moorhead, Morris, Northfield, Perham, Park Rapids, St. Paul and Wadena. They also will be in Arizona, California, Illinois, Michigan, New York and Wisconsin.

What To Read Next
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.
The number of cows going to slaughter is far above the five-year average. Attendees of the annual Cow Calf Days tour in Minnesota heard the latest on cattle trends.
As Mikkel Pates approaches his retirement from Agweek after 44 years in journalism, he talks to Rose Dunn about learning TV, covering ag's characters and scandals and looking toward the future.
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.