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Learn how to easily access past editions of your e-paper in the archives

Subscribers have unlimited access to the Agweek e-paper, which now includes years of archives at your fingertips. Read on to learn how you can easily view the e-paper archives for full Agweek editions or quickly and easily search for the ag news that matters most to you.

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In addition to the most current ag news, we record the history of life on the land. We know this historical content is valuable and have heard your requests to provide this information in an easily accessible format.

Now, you can conveniently view entire Agweek editions and search the archives for the topics you wish to view. The e-paper archives can be accessed through the online Agweek.com site or through the e-paper app available in the Apple App Store or the Google Play Store as the “Agweek E-paper.”

If you aren’t familiar with the e-paper or electronic edition of Agweek, we recommend you read the “ Learn how to use your e-paper ” article first, for helpful tips on navigating this tool.

Where to find the e-paper archive

Once you have logged into the e-paper, the archive is located in the black menu bar in the top right. It looks like a tiny filing cabinet.

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Simply select this icon and a window will open with your e-paper archive options. The available months and years for you to view are listed in a menu on the left. The small pictures you see of the newspapers are the specific editions available to you. For example, if you wish to view an edition in August of 2019, you scroll down on the left to “August 2019” and tap or click to see all the editions from that month and year. Then select the specific edition you wish to view on the right and it will open with the same viewing options as the e-paper you know and love.

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How to search the e-paper archive

Also in the black menu bar at the top right, select the icon that looks like a magnifying glass.

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This will open a window where you can enter what you are searching for in the archive. From here you can search the current edition, all editions or a specific date with your search term. Please note, that if you have already navigated to a specific edition from the instructions above, selecting “Current Edition” will only search within the edition you have selected. If you enter the e-paper and do not navigate to a different date, this option will only search the latest edition.

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Once you select which edition or date you wish to search, all of the available matches will appear. Tap or click on the option you wish to view to load that page and your search term will be highlighted on the page for easy visibility.

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If you wish to view additional pages from your search, simply select the magnifying glass icon again and your search results will reappear for you to use.

Need assistance?

Your Member Services team is here to help you with your e-paper or any other questions or concerns you may have about your subscription. You can also email Member Services at memberservices@agweek.com or call 701-451-5775 for assistance. We look forward to helping you access the full value of your subscription benefits.

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