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JSDC Board approves funding internship program

The Internship Reimbursement Program funded 15 interns for eight employers from seven universities or colleges prior to the board approving three internships Monday, said Corry Shevlin, Jamestown/Stutsman Development Corp. business development director.

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The Jamestown/Stutsman Development Corp. Board of Directors unanimously approved Monday, Jan. 10, funding the Internship Reimbursement Program up to $105,000 for 2022-23.

Corry Shevlin, JSDC business development director, said an additional $51,825 is needed to fund the program, which began this year, at $105,000 for 2022-23. The city of Jamestown’s share will be $41,460 and Stutsman County’s share will be $10,635.

The total allocated from the program was $53,175 in 2021-22 to employers who hired the interns, he said.

The Internship Reimbursement Program is designed to increase the number of local internships and help employers in workforce recruitment and retention, according to JSDC's website. The program contributes up to $3,500 to reimburse employers that are hiring university/college students to assist in payroll costs and is open to employers in Stutsman County.

The Internship Reimbursement Program funded 15 interns for eight employers from seven universities or colleges prior to the board approving three internships Monday, Shevlin said.

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… I think this program will only grow in popularity. If we get five or 10 (interns) to stay, I think that is a wildly successful program.
Corry Shevlin, business development director, Jamestown/Stutsman Development Corp.

“On the workforce committee, we are doing a lot more outreach continually when it comes to interns or friendships,” he said. “ … I think this program will only grow in popularity. If we get five or 10 (interns) to stay, I think that is a wildly successful program.”

In other business, the board unanimously approved making the JSDC Executive Committee the search committee for the next CEO.

Connie Ova announced a May 13 retirement date from the JSDC. Ova has held the position since November 2003.

The job description for the next CEO will include information on the community and the successful projects JSDC has accomplished throughout the years and the economic development opportunities in the future. The job description will also include a reference to the responsibilities of the Spiritwood Energy Park Association and building management at the Center for Economic Development.

The CEO job opening will be posted on the websites of Indeed, Job Service North Dakota, North Dakota of Association of Counties, North Dakota League of Cities, Economic Development Association of North Dakota, International Economic Development Council and MidAmerica Economic Development Council, Ova said.

The executive committee consists of Marlee Siewert, chair of the JSDC Board of Directors; Tory Hart, vice chair of the board; Nick Schauer, board secretary/treasurer; Kelly Rachel, past board chair; Mayor Dwaine Heinrich, at-large board member through the Jamestown City Council; Stutsman County Commission Chair Mark Klose, at-large member of the board through the county commission; and Ova, who is a nonvoting member on the committee.

Masaki Ova joined The Jamestown Sun in August 2021 as a reporter. He grew up on a farm near Pingree, N.D. He majored in communications at the University of Jamestown, N.D.
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