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Help available for livestock death losses due to blizzard

Livestock producers who have experienced animal losses due to weather conditions are urged to reach out to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency for information about the Livestock Indemnity Program.

April blizzard
Ranchers experiencing livestock death losses in excess of normal mortality from recent storms may be eligible for payment through the Livestock Indemnity Program.
Contributed / Schmidt Ranch
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Livestock producers who have experienced animal losses due to weather conditions are urged to reach out to the U.S. Department of Agriculutre's Farm Service Agency for information about the Livestock Indemnity Program.

The Livestock Indemnity Program provides benefits to agricultural producers for livestock deaths in excess of normal mortality caused by adverse weather, disease or by attacks by animals reintroduced into the wild by the federal government. Eligible weather events include earthquake, hail, lightning, tornado, hurricane, flood, blizzard, wildfire, extreme heat, extreme cold, straight-line winds, and eligible winter storms.

The Livestock Indemnity Program applies to the loss of cattle, poultry, swine, sheep, horses, goats, bison and other eligible livestock.

A fact sheet for the livestock indemnity program is available on the FSA website . The fact sheet provides what is eligible livestock, eligible loss conditions, payment rates, how to file for the Livestock Indemnity Program and loss documentation. Ranchers need to file a notice of loss with the FSA within 30 days of when the loss is apparent and must file an application for payment within 60 calendar days after the end of the calendar year in which the loss occurred.

Producers will need to provide proper records on their losses, including pictures with time and death of livestock. Contact FSA for more information about the program and its requirements.

Related Topics: LIVESTOCKPOLICYWINTER STORM
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