ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Former ag commish Vogel exploring run for governor

BISMARCK - Former North Dakota agriculture commissioner Sarah Vogel said Tuesday she is in the early stages of exploring a run for governor next year, becoming the first Democrat to publicly acknowledge a possible gubernatorial bid.

North Dakota

BISMARCK – Former North Dakota agriculture commissioner Sarah Vogel said Tuesday she is in the early stages of exploring a run for governor next year, becoming the first Democrat to publicly acknowledge a possible gubernatorial bid.

“I am in the thinking about it stage,” Vogel said in a phone interview with Forum News Service.

Vogel served two terms as state agriculture commissioner from 1989 to 1997. She opted not to seek a third term and instead ran for state Supreme Court in 1996, losing to Mary Maring. Prior to that, she spent about five years in private practice and two years as an assistant attorney general.

She has worked in private practice since leaving state government.

“I have been asked to run for one office or another every election cycle for the last 20 years. And I always say ‘no, no.’ But this time I’m saying I’ll look at it. Because I think there’s a need for different leadership. There are a lot of issues,” she said.

ADVERTISEMENT

The 69-year-old Vogel said she has no timetable for announcing whether she will run. The Democratic-NPL Party will hold its nominating convention March 31-April 2 in Bismarck.

Related Topics: NORTH DAKOTA
What To Read Next
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.
The number of cows going to slaughter is far above the five-year average. Attendees of the annual Cow Calf Days tour in Minnesota heard the latest on cattle trends.
As Mikkel Pates approaches his retirement from Agweek after 44 years in journalism, he talks to Rose Dunn about learning TV, covering ag's characters and scandals and looking toward the future.
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.