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ConAgra to disclose GMOs on labels throughout U.S.

ConAgra Foods Inc on Tuesday joined other food giants in plans to use labels that disclose the presence of genetically modified organisms or GMOs in its food throughout the U.S.

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ConAgra Foods Inc on Tuesday joined other food giants in plans to use labels that disclose the presence of genetically modified organisms or GMOs in its food throughout the U.S.

ConAgra and other food companies such as Campbell Soup Co , General Mills Inc and Kellogg Co have decided to use such labels nationwide, finding it to be the easiest way to comply with a Vermont law.

In 2014, Vermont became the first U.S. state to pass a law requiring food companies to label GMOs on their products, which will come into effect in July.

ConAgra said while it believed consumers should be informed as to what is in their food, addressing labeling requirements separately, just for the state of Vermont would be a costly affair. 

"With a multitude of other states currently considering different GMO labeling requirements, the need for a national, uniform approach in this area is as critical as ever. That's why we continue to urge Congress to pass a national solution as quickly as possible," the company said in a statement.

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The U.S. Senate, last week, blocked a bill that would nullify state and local efforts requiring food makers to label products made with genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, as the industry races to stop the Vermont law from taking effect July 1.

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