ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

China wasted 20 percent of wind power generated in 2015

BEIJING - Energy wastage on wind farms in China worsened in 2015, as plunging utilization rates kept 33.9 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) from being delivered to the grid, the energy regulator said, the equivalent of a fifth of total generated wind ...

2211267+ChinaNews.jpg

BEIJING - Energy wastage on wind farms in China worsened in 2015, as plunging utilization rates kept 33.9 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) from being delivered to the grid, the energy regulator said, the equivalent of a fifth of total generated wind power.

Average utilization rates last year fell 165 hours from 2014, the regulator said, calling for tougher measures to cut wastage, as China works to boost grid capacity and convince transmission firms to give priority to renewable energy.

"Restrictions on power caused by waste wind have already become a major problem impacting the healthy development of the wind power sector," the National Energy Administration said on its website.

China's total wind power capacity reached 133.3 gigawatts by the end of February, making up 9 percent of its total, but generation levels, at 168 billion kWh, accounted for just 3 percent of the national total in 2015.

Critics have accused local governments of focusing on capacity rather than efficiency and utilization, hitting renewable energy targets by building windfarms in regions plagued by low wind speeds and insufficient grid capacity.

ADVERTISEMENT

The regulator said it would create a power trading mechanism to transmit wind power across provincial and regional boundaries, besides taking action to make sure increases in generation and transmission capacity go hand-in-hand.

China aims to raise the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy mix to 15 percent by the end of 2020, up from 12 percent in 2015.

What To Read Next
Iowa-based Summit Carbon Solutions says its pipeline project will help ethanol plants. The project aims to capture greenhouse gas emissions and pipe the CO2 to western North Dakota for underground storage.
The number of cows going to slaughter is far above the five-year average. Attendees of the annual Cow Calf Days tour in Minnesota heard the latest on cattle trends.
As Mikkel Pates approaches his retirement from Agweek after 44 years in journalism, he talks to Rose Dunn about learning TV, covering ag's characters and scandals and looking toward the future.
Members Only
“In our industry there aren’t a lot of young people in it. I like the fact that there are a lot of young people in agriculture here,” he said of the Mitchell area.