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Century Farm applications now available in Minnesota

Minnesota families who have owned their farms for 100 years or more may apply for the 2016 Century Farms Program. Family farms are recognized as Century Farms when they meet three requirements. The farm must be 1) at least 100 years old according...

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Minnesota news

Minnesota families who have owned their farms for 100 years or more may apply for the 2016 Century Farms Program.

Family farms are recognized as Century Farms when they meet three requirements. The farm must be 1) at least 100 years old according to authentic land records; 2) in continuous family ownership for at least 100 years, continuous residence on the farm not required; and 3) at least 50 acres.

A commemorative certificate signed by State Fair Board of Managers President Sharon Wessel, Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation President Kevin Paap and Gov. Mark Dayton will be awarded to qualifying families, along with an outdoor sign signifying Century Farm status.

Information on all Century Farms will be available at the Minnesota Farm Bureau exhibit during the 2016 Minnesota State Fair, which runs Aug. 25-Sept. 5. A Century Farm database is also available at fbmn.org.

Produced by the Minnesota State Fair in conjunction with the Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation, the Century Farms Program was created to promote agriculture and honor historic family farms in the state.

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To apply

Applications are available online at mnstatefair.org by clicking "Recognition Programs," at fbmn.org, by calling the State Fair at (651) 288-4400, or at statewide county extension and county Farm Bureau offices.

The submission deadline is Friday, April 1. Recipients will be announced in May. Previously recognized families should not reapply.

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