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$4 million available through Water Bank Program

BISMARCK, N.D. - U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service State Conservationist Mary Podoll announced that $4 million in financial assistance will be available to help eligible landowners and operators in three stat...

3213054+wetlands - NRCS photo.jpg
NRCS photo

BISMARCK, N.D. – U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service State Conservationist Mary Podoll announced that $4 million in financial assistance will be available to help eligible landowners and operators in three states voluntarily enhance wildlife habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife. The selected states - Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota-will begin to accept applications on June 12.

The newly funded Water Bank Program provides landowners and operators with an alternative use for their flooded or frequently flooded lands, such as quality wildlife habitat for priority migratory bird species. Eligible land for this year’s WBP included flooded agricultural land, flooded hay, pasture or rangeland, and flooded private forestland.

Landowners and operators can sign new 10-year rental agreements to protect wetlands and provide wildlife habitat. Landowners receive annual payments for conserving and protecting wetlands and adjacent lands from adverse land uses and activities, such as drainage, that would destroy the wetland characteristics of those lands.

The sign-up will be held June 12-23.  Please contact your local NRCS service center for more information.

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