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Jessica Rerick's Southwest Quinoa and Rice Skillet

This recipe is loaded with dry edible beans and is sure to be a family pleaser.

Quinoa, rice, bean and corn topped with spices and black tortilla chips.
Jessica Rerick developed this recipe on the fly after she found out she was lacking ingredients for another recipe she was going to make for dinner for her family of six before baseball practice. She says cooks can make the recipe their own by changing the beans or adding anything they like. Her kids loved this as is, topped with plenty of tortilla chips. She encourages cooks to add their own garnishes. She loves avocados, Greek yogurt, and cilantro.
Contributed / Jessica Rerick
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Jessica Rerick is a personal chef, caterer and group culinary instructor. But she's also a member of a family rooted in the dry edible beans business. She's part of North Dakota's Karley family, which not only grows beans but also owns and operates Johnstown Bean Co. and North Central Commodities Inc.

Rerick developed this recipe on the fly after she found out she was lacking ingredients for another recipe she was going to make for her family of six before baseball practice. She says cooks can make the recipe their own by changing the beans or adding anything they like. Her kids loved this as is, topped with plenty of tortilla chips. She encourages cooks to add their own garnishes. She loves avocados, Greek yogurt, and cilantro.

For more of her recipes, visit wineandhotdish.com.

Southwest Quinoa and Rice Skillet

Makes 8 servings

Ingredients:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large yellow onion, diced
3 bell peppers, diced (I used red, yellow, and orange)
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 1/2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 1/2 tablespoon chili powder
1 tablespoon paprika
2 teaspoons dried oregano leaves
2 cans diced tomatoes and green chilies (mild or hot)
1 cup frozen corn
1 – 15 ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 – 15 ounce can dark red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 – 15 ounce can garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed
32 ounces vegetable or chicken broth
1 cup water
1 1/2 cup rice, white or brown
1/2 cup quinoa (I used tri-color)
1/4 cup lime juice, fresh

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Garnish:
fresh chopped cilantro
avocado, sliced
tortilla chips, crushed
hot sauce

Procedure:
In a large skillet with a lid, heat olive oil over high heat until shimmering. Add onions and bell peppers, Season with salt and pepper and cook until soft, about 5 minutes. Add all other ingredients and stir until combined. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and let simmer for 20 minutes. Remove the lid, add lime juice and stir until combined.

Read more dry edible bean news:
About 35 representatives of foreign governments spent a week touring farms, research sites and agribusinesses across Minnesota. Visits ranged from Hormel and soybean farms in the southeast to sugarbeet farms and processing in the Red River Valley.
A desire for the rural lifestyle and the opportunity to carry on the family farming legacy were two of the major reasons that influenced Nick Hagen’s decision to farm.
Denise and Jim Karley own Karley Farm, Johnstown Bean Co. and North Central Commodities Inc., their son Dylan Karley, owns Dylan Karley Farm and is general manager of Johnstown Bean Co. and North Central Commodities Inc, and his sister, Nora Hubbard, is office manager and controller of the two businesses.
The winter rye reduces soil erosion, suppresses weeds and soaks up excess moisture, the study conducted at the Carrington (North Dakota) Research Extension Center said.
The edible bean crop in North Dakota, the No. 1 producer in the United States, was rated 8% excellent, 48% good, 41% fair and 3% poor the week ending Aug. 21, according to the U.S. Agriculture Department National Agricultural Statistics Service.
A new appreciation has developed for rye, a winter-hardy grain that develops a deep root system. Growing rye is seen as beneficial to soil health, is a strong competitor to weeds, and helps reduce erosion from water and wind. It can be a companion crop to soybeans, edible beans and sugarbeets to cut down on wind damage as plants emerge. In areas with livestock, producers can graze it or harvest it for forage.

Opinion by Staff reports
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