ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

U.S. kills 39,000 turkeys in outbreak of mild bird flu

CHICAGO - U.S. authorities destroyed 39,000 turkeys in Missouri due to an outbreak of a mild form of avian flu, the World Organization for Animal Health said on Tuesday.

2500741+112415.A.GFH_.TurkeyRecovery13.jpg
Forum News Service file photo.

CHICAGO - U.S. authorities destroyed 39,000 turkeys in Missouri due to an outbreak of a mild form of avian flu, the World Organization for Animal Health said on Tuesday.

Authorities also have begun a quarantine and taken surveillance measures around the Missouri farm that was hit with the H5N1 strain of the virus late last month, according to a notice from the organization known as the OIE.

The strain is considered low pathogenic, meaning it is not as contagious or deadly as other varieties of the disease, the notice said.

Last year, almost 50 million chickens and turkeys died in the United States because they were infected with a fast-moving outbreak of highly pathogenic bird flu or culled to contain the disease.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Missouri Department of Agriculture are investigating the infection in Missouri, according to the OIE.

ADVERTISEMENT

Officials from the USDA and the Missouri Department of Agriculture did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Related Topics: HEALTHLIVESTOCKFOOD
What To Read Next
Commercial farmers in Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Minnesota start using drones for spraying, seeding.
This week on AgweekTV, we hear about North Dakota corporate farming legislation and about WOTUS challenges. Our livestock tour visits a seedstock operation and a rabbit farm. And we hear about new uses for drones.
Kevin and Lynette Thompson brought TNT Simmental Ranch to life in 1985. Now, their daughter, Shanon Erbele, and her husband, Gabriel, are taking over the reins, and their sale is for Feb. 10.
Gevo will be making sustainable aviation fuel in Lake Preston, South Dakota. Summit Carbon Solutions plans to capture carbon emissions from the facility.