ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Southern Manitoba oats plant to expand product line

In January, Buffalo Creek Mills in Altona, Manitoba, plans to begin heat-treating oats using a customized kiln that will allow the company to further process oats for use in food ingredients and create emerging oats products.

field-8948_1920.jpg
Buffalo Creek Mills contracts with oat growers, most of them in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A small percentage of the bushels are sourced from northern North Dakota. Courtesy / Pixabay

The expansion of equipment at Buffalo Creek Mills will allow the Altona, Manitoba, oat plant to further process products in-house.

The company in December received a $5 million federal loan from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, which it will use to purchase and install new technology that will increase the kinds of products that can be produced there.

In January, the oat facility plans to begin heat-treating oats using a customized kiln that will allow. Buffalo Creek Mills to further process oats for use in food ingredients and to create emerging oats products.

The Altona company, launched in 2015 with three employees, will have the capability to annually process 3.24 million bushels of oats after installation of the equipment. Buffalo Creek Mills serves human edible, pet food, and bird food markets in North America, processing non-stabilized oat groats into human-grade products and pet-grade products.

The $5.1 million loan will help the company continue to expand its product line and bring the number of employees to as many as 45, said Ryan Penner, Buffalo Creek Mills CEO.

ADVERTISEMENT

Buffalo Creek Mills contracts with oat growers, most of them in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. A small percentage of the bushels are sourced from northern North Dakota. The company’s contracts with farmers require the production of approved varieties, which must meet certain specifications.

Ann is a journalism veteran with nearly 40 years of reporting and editing experiences on a variety of topics including agriculture and business. Story ideas or questions can be sent to Ann by email at: abailey@agweek.com or phone at: 218-779-8093.
What To Read Next
This week on AgweekTV, we hear about North Dakota corporate farming legislation and about WOTUS challenges. Our livestock tour visits a seedstock operation and a rabbit farm. And we hear about new uses for drones.
Kevin and Lynette Thompson brought TNT Simmental Ranch to life in 1985. Now, their daughter, Shanon Erbele, and her husband, Gabriel, are taking over the reins, and their sale is for Feb. 10.
Gevo will be making sustainable aviation fuel in Lake Preston, South Dakota. Summit Carbon Solutions plans to capture carbon emissions from the facility.
Even if it's not a lucrative venture, the hobby of raising rabbits continues at this farm near Sebeka, Minnesota.