ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Research: French fries have health benefits

French fries often are criticized as unhealthy. But new research shows that the food provides health benefits, according to the the Alliance for Potato Research and Education.

2347719+22292882544_4a59fde281_o.jpg
Flickr.com
We are part of The Trust Project.

French fries often are criticized as unhealthy. But new research shows that the food provides health benefits, according to the the Alliance for Potato Research and Education.

“French fries, as part of mixed meals, produce lower blood glucose and insulin levels in children,” the organization says.

It points to research at the University of Toronto, which involved two studies that assessed food intake, calorie intake, blood glucose and insulin levels in normal-weight children aged 11 to 13. The children consumed a fixed amount of meat and an unlimited amount of carbohydrate side dishes, either boiled, mashed potatoes; rice; pasta; baked French fries or fried French fries, according to information from the Alliance.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Contrary to popular belief, the children did not overeat when served fried French fries. The study showed that they did not consume more calories with fried French fries compared with rice, pasta and baked French fries,” the Alliance says.

To read more about the University of Toronto research, click here .


The Alliance for Potato Research and Education (APRE) describes itself as a “ not-for-profit organization 100 percent dedicated to expanding and translating scientific research into evidence-based policy and education initiatives that recognize the role of all forms of the potato-a nutritious vegetable-in promoting health for all age groups.”

Related Topics: HEALTHCROPS
What to read next
This week on AgweekTV, the Casselton ethanol plant suffered a big loss with the death of its COO. We talk with owner Gary Tharaldson. This is the best time of year for people who like their produce straight from the farm. And, a South Dakota elevator takes a drastic measure to fill a serious labor shortage.
Leaders at Red Trail Energy, an ethanol processing plant in Richardton, N.D., showcased their new carbon capture operation facility. With very few other carbon capture operations in America, this newest climate-conscious operation sets southwestern North Dakota on the leading edge of carbon sequestration technology.
A legislative field event at Albert Lea Seed on July 26 highlighted the work that’s been done in the past decade by more than 50 researchers of the University of Minnesota’s Forever Green Initiative.
Landowners and community menmbers in Redwood and Cottonwood counties voiced concerns about proposed Summit Carbon Solutions proposed project at meeting in Lamberton, according to the Clean Up our River Environment organization.