ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Research: French fries have health benefits

French fries often are criticized as unhealthy. But new research shows that the food provides health benefits, according to the the Alliance for Potato Research and Education.

2347719+22292882544_4a59fde281_o.jpg
Flickr.com

French fries often are criticized as unhealthy. But new research shows that the food provides health benefits, according to the the Alliance for Potato Research and Education.

“French fries, as part of mixed meals, produce lower blood glucose and insulin levels in children,” the organization says.

It points to research at the University of Toronto, which involved two studies that assessed food intake, calorie intake, blood glucose and insulin levels in normal-weight children aged 11 to 13. The children consumed a fixed amount of meat and an unlimited amount of carbohydrate side dishes, either boiled, mashed potatoes; rice; pasta; baked French fries or fried French fries, according to information from the Alliance.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Contrary to popular belief, the children did not overeat when served fried French fries. The study showed that they did not consume more calories with fried French fries compared with rice, pasta and baked French fries,” the Alliance says.

To read more about the University of Toronto research, click here .


The Alliance for Potato Research and Education (APRE) describes itself as a “ not-for-profit organization 100 percent dedicated to expanding and translating scientific research into evidence-based policy and education initiatives that recognize the role of all forms of the potato-a nutritious vegetable-in promoting health for all age groups.”

Related Topics: HEALTHCROPS
What To Read Next
Commercial farmers in Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Minnesota start using drones for spraying, seeding.
This week on AgweekTV, we hear about North Dakota corporate farming legislation and about WOTUS challenges. Our livestock tour visits a seedstock operation and a rabbit farm. And we hear about new uses for drones.
Kevin and Lynette Thompson brought TNT Simmental Ranch to life in 1985. Now, their daughter, Shanon Erbele, and her husband, Gabriel, are taking over the reins, and their sale is for Feb. 10.
Gevo will be making sustainable aviation fuel in Lake Preston, South Dakota. Summit Carbon Solutions plans to capture carbon emissions from the facility.