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Report shows 2019 crop continues to lag

Cooperative fall weather is always important to Upper Midwest farmers. It will be especially important this year, with most area crops still far behind their normal development. The weekly crop progress report, released July 22 by the National Ag...

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Cooperative fall weather is always important to Upper Midwest farmers. It will be especially important this year, with most area crops still far behind their normal development.

The weekly crop progress report, released July 22 by the National Agricultural Statistics Service, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, found that the maturity of area crops, especially corn and soybeans, continues to lag their five-year averages.

The report reflects conditions as of July 21.

Planting this spring was hampered by wet, cold weather, and those planting delays inevitably have slowed crops' normal development. One example: 47% of Minnesota soybeans had bloomed on July 21; the five-year average for that date was 70%.

Favorable fall weather - particularly the lack of an early frost - will be necessary to give crops the time they need to catch up.

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Here's a look at spring wheat, corn and soybean:

Spring wheat

Montana: 87% of spring wheat had headed by July 21, compared with the five-year average for that date of 91%; 64% of spring wheat was rated good or excellent, the rest fair to very poor.

Minnesota: 100% of spring wheat had headed by July 21, compared with the five-year average for that date of 96 %; 85% of spring wheat was in good or excellent shape, the rest fair to very poor.

North Dakota: 93% had headed by July 21, the same as the five-year average; 80% was rated good or excellent, the rest fair to very poor.

South Dakota: 86% had headed by July 21, down from the five-year average of 98 %; 70% was in good or excellent shape, the rest fair to very poor.

Corn

Minnesota: 21% of corn had silked by July 21, compared with the five-year average of 56%; 57% was rated good or excellent, the rest fair to very poor.

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North Dakota: 10% of corn had silked by July 21, compared with the five-year average of 32%; 77% was in good or excellent shape, the rest fair to very poor.

South Dakota: 9% of corn had silked by July 21, down from the five-year average of 50%; 58% was rated good or excellent, the rest fair to very poor.

Soybeans

Minnesota: 47% of soybeans had bloomed by July 21, compared with the five-year average of 70%; 60% was in good or excellent condition, the rest fair to very poor.

North Dakota: 49% of soybeans had bloomed by July 21, compared with the five-year average of 70%; 66% was in good or excellent shape, the rest fair to very poor.

South Dakota: 45% of beans had bloomed by July 21, compared with the five-year average of 65%; 47% was rated good or excellent, the rest fair to very poor.

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