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Questions, answers on poultry

If you've got questions about U.S. poultry and egg production, the U.S. Poultry and Egg Association has answers. The organization has created two informational videos to help consumers and others learn more about the poultry industry. It also off...

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If you've got questions about U.S. poultry and egg production, the U.S. Poultry and Egg Association has answers.

The organization has created two informational videos to help consumers and others learn more about the poultry industry. It also offers statistics on the industry's economic impact - including the nearly half-million jobs that the industry provides nationwide.

One video follows chickens and turkeys from the hatchery to the farm. The other examines "Poultry and the Hormone Myth." The video stresses that no hormones actually are used.

Poultry are domesticated birds raised for food, such as chickens, turkeys, ducks and geese. Chicken, turkey, and ducks are among the most widely distributed food animals in the world and are part of every major cuisine, the association says.

Nationwide, the poultry industry's annual economic impact totals $441 billion, with the industry paying $34.5 billion per year in taxes and directly providing 497,700 jobs, according to the informational material.

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The association also breaks down the industry's economic impact by state, congressional district, state house district, state senate district and county.

The U.S. Poultry and Egg Association, based in Tucker, Ga., describes itself as "representing the complete spectrum of today's poultry industry." Its members include producers and processors of broilers, turkeys, ducks, eggs and breeding stock, as well as allied firms.

More information: www.poultryfeedsamerica.org/

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