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Palmer amaranth found in Ward County, North Dakota

According to the North Dakota Department of Agriculture, a producer noticed some suspect plants in a field while combining, and samples were submitted for DNA analysis to the National Agricultural Genotyping Center, where it was confirmed as Palmer amaranth.

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Palmer amaranth plants can reach 6 to 8 feet tall, and a single plant can produce up to 1 million seeds. NDSU photo
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BISMARCK, North Dakota — Palmer amaranth has been confirmed in Ward County, North Dakota.

According to the North Dakota Department of Agriculture, a producer noticed some suspect plants in a field while combining, and samples were submitted for DNA analysis to the National Agricultural Genotyping Center, where it was confirmed as Palmer amaranth.

“Due to the drought, many producers have purchased hay or used screenings to feed livestock. I strongly encourage those who are moving feedstuffs or have purchased feed to monitor for noxious weeds in all areas where storage, feeding, foraging and manure spreading occurred,” Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said. “With harvest season wrapping up, farmers are also encouraged to scout fields and clean excess dirt and plant debris off equipment between fields to prevent unintentional spread.”

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The public is urged to contact and work with their local weed officers and other experts to identify and report suspect plants. Palmer amaranth may spread through multiple channels, including contaminated seed mixes; equipment and machinery; animal feed and bedding; and wildlife.
Palmer amaranth has now been found in 14 North Dakota counties. More information on noxious and invasive weeds is available at https://www.nd.gov/ndda/plant-industries/noxious-weeds .

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To report a suspect plant, go to https://www.nd.gov/ndda/pa or contact your local county weed officer.

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