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On-farm visits help Minnesota’s Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program have multi-state impact

The Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program at Minnesota West Community and Technical College at Pipestone, Minn., serves sheep producers primarily in Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa.

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From right: Kim and Brian Fruechte, of Verdi, Minn., shepherd their sheep enterprise with pro tips the Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program, including new instructor Ann Kolthoff. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

( This is the seventh stop on the 2021 Agweek Livestock Tour. Follow the tour by clicking here. )

PIPESTONE, Minn. — The Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program is nearly 50 years old and using new tools to shepherd producers into an increasingly profitable enterprise.

Instructors are based at Minnesota West Community and Technical College at Pipestone, but spend much of their time on the road to the 120 farms they serve, primarily in Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa.

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Ann Kolthoff has joined Phil Berg as instructors in the Pipestone (Minn.) Lamb and Wool Program, a 49-year-old program based at the Minnesota West Community and Technical College campus at Pipestone. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Pipestone, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

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The staff is led by veteran instructor Philip Berg, who grew up on his family’s Pipestone area sheep farm. He’s been an instructor with the Pipestone program since 2005.

Like ‘cr op consulting’

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Brian Fruechte of Verdi, Minn., grew up on a farm with a sheep flock of a sizeable 600 ewes. Today, he’s lambing in his third season, getting into the enterprise with his wife, Kim, and four children. They have 150 ewes and are heading toward 200. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

The Pipestone program is the only one Berg knows of in the U.S. all of its parts — research-backed education, consultation, networking and risk management through marketing.

“I consider part of our program is very similar to crop consulting, where they’re coming out and viewing their crop,” Berg said. “We’re going out and viewing their facilities, viewing their ewes, looking at their body condition, looking at the lambs, at how they’re growing.

“Recently we’ve had a lot of excitement in the sheep industry because of some of the economics that we’ve seen,” Berg said.

Ann Kolthoff of Brookings, S.D., joined as a new instructor in July 2020. She says the best thing about the program is helping producers.

“Right now we’re starting our lambing season,” Kolthoff said. “What they’re worried about at this point in time is items that are going to affect their lambing season, and keep their lambs alive.”

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Young, growing

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From right: Kim and Brian Fruechte, of Verdi, Minn., shepherd their sheep enterprise with pro tips the Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program, including new instructor Ann Kolthoff. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

On a February farm visit, Kolthoff visited the snug lambing barn that Brian Fruechte (“FRIK-tee”), and his wife, Kim, at Verdi, Minn., in Lincoln County, built in the past year. As they strolled through the Fruechtes’ new facilities, the topics ranged from nutrition to equipment.

The Fruechtes, both 37, said they’re making sheep a focal part of their diversified farming family life. After graduating from Pipestone High School, Brian and Kim went on to SDSU. They graduated in 2005 — Brian in ag economics/ag business, and Kim in consumer affairs/human resources. They married, worked briefly in Sioux Falls, S.D., and returned to farm when his grandfather — David — moved to town. The young couple raise corn and soybeans, sharing equipment with his father, Michael, who lives nearby. Brian also has started a crop insurance agency and a seed dealership.

Brian said raising sheep is part of his heritage. Michael once had about 600 ewes when his three sons were in high school. “As we slowly left the home he slowly replaced them with cattle,” Brian said.

In 2017 Brian and Kim bought 150 ewes.

Brian and Kim built two 30-by-85 foot hoop barns, but after the tough winter in 2019, they invested in an insulated, 30-by-36 foot pole shed lambing barn, situated between the hoop barns. This allows January lambing, instead of delaying until April.

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Brian and Kim Fruechte of Verdi, Minn., first built two hoop barns for their growing sheep flock. After a tough winter in 2019, they added a heated lambing barn in-between. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

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The best part is that the Fruechtes’ four children, ages 5 to 12, all can help. The kids can care for lambs and ewes, putting them into a “jug” — a small pen that confines the ewe with a new lamb, usually for three to five days. The kids have a handful of 4-H ewes and work with chores such as bedding, feeding and vaccinating.

Some younger producers see sheep as a “stepping stone” in their farming enterprise, Berg said.

“On average, probably 25% to 50% of their income comes from sheep,” he said.

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Young Micah Fruechte, age 5, is getting into the sheep chores on the farm at Verdi, Minn., joining the ranks of older siblings, Alivia, 12; Lane, 11; and Hadley, 8. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

Sheep offer profit opportunities in most years, he said. One thing that’s universal is that management plays a big role in profitability.

“If we’re doing a very good job managing our ewes, getting a lot of lambs born, keeping those lambs to market, it can be very profitable,” Berg acknowledged.

Changing tools

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Ann Kolthoff (left) who started as an instructor for the Pipestone (Minn) Lamb and Wool Program in July 2020, on Feb. 3, 2021, visits about lambing strategies with Brian and Kim Fruechte of Verdi, Minn., with their son, Micah, 5. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

Participants in the program pay for four to 10 college credits a year, which figures at $600 and up. They can earn a diploma from Minnesota West Community and Technical College.

The farms in the program average 400 to 500 ewes and range from 50 to 1,200 ewes.

Cost is in part based in part on the distance from Pipestone, but also on the flock size. The “small flock” rate is 100 ewes or less, one visit per year in February to March. The “intermediate” level is 100 to 200 ewes, with the February-March visit and a mid- to late-summer consultation. Farms of 200 ewes and above are “full members,” usually with three or four visits. Still another 15 are members more than 200 miles away and belong under the “Sheep Central Consulting” program, allowing two virtual visits per year.

The program officially started in 1972, then a joint effort of National Sheep Industry Development board, the technical college and the Minnesota Department of Education.

It’s done what it was designed to do — make a strong sheep region even stronger.

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Instructors Philp Berg and Ann Kolthoff show the display case honoring past leaders in the sheep business for the Pipestone Lamb and Wool Program, based at the Minnesota West Community and Technical College. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Pipestone, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

The idea was to help crop farmers to be more “fully employed” through the year by adding a livestock enterprise that could use existing facilities and include families.

The program became known for its in-person short courses and bus tours. Producers would come to central locations for evening meetings, scheduled according to work schedules. As production grew, farmers built some “infrastructure” in the sheep health and feed industries. Many years, more 500 people would have participated.

Producers in the program sell about 35,000 to 40,000 lambs annually. The majority of the lambs are sold under a supply agreement. The current agreement is with Superior Farms of Dixon, Calif., which maintains a processing plant at Denver. Even in the 2020 COVID-19 year, the agreement provided guaranteed delivery of lambs for harvest.

“One of the key components of the program is that we’re marketing a high-quality product in a low-supply time period, when the industry needs high-quality animals,” Berg said.

The group lambs now through the spring and feeds aggressively, so the lambs are market-ready at 5 to 6 months of age.

“Our group averages around 133 pounds. We probably market at 120 to close to 150 pounds,” Berg said.

Sharing wins, losses

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Brian Fruechte feeds cattle on a five-generation farm at Verdi, S.D., but the family is shifting toward sheep, housed in the hoop barns at top. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

Berg said one of the key assets is how program participants share ideas with each other — things that have worked and things that haven’t.

The tools for sharing are changing, especially during a pandemic.

“Today we’re using Zoom to reach a larger population, allowing them to participate without the travel,” Berg said. About six years ago they shifted to smaller “Farm Focus Group” meetings at individual farms.

Berg holds a bachelor’s degree from South Dakota State University and a master’s in range science from North Dakota State University. He worked at NDSU’s Hettinger Research Extension Center before returning to Pipestone and is still involved in the farm.

Kolthoff grew up on a small grain and cattle farm at New Hampton, Iowa, achieved bachelor’s and master’s degrees in animal science (ruminant focus) from SDSU, and managed SDSU’s Sheep Research and Teaching Unit. Before coming to the program, she worked for two years with Strauss Brands Inc., of Milwaukee, Wis., a smaller, niche-market meat packing company that handles lamb, beef and veal.

They conduct lambing time short courses for members and non-members via Zoom.

This year, a winter-spring webinar series focused on late gestation management, getting lambs off to a good start and milk replacer information, among the topics. Another webinar featured University of Minnesota health specialists zeroing in on controlling coccidiosis, an intestinal tract infection, as well as genomics.

On the farm, instructors evaluate various risk management tools, including the feed side.

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The Brian and Kim Fruechte family has been in the sheep business since 2017. The Fruechtes have 150 ewes today and expect to increase to at least 200. On Feb. 3, 2021, the pen of ewes were moving into the busy lambing time. Photo taken Feb. 3, 2021, at Verdi, Minn. Mikkel Pates / Agweek

A perennial theme is how to manage larger numbers of sheep with the same amount of labor.

“We probably spend 60% to 70% of our labor time feeding and taking care of the sheep,” Berg said. “If we can find ways to feed, bed, water those sheep more efficiently, it allows us to run larger numbers.”

They counsel members on how to manage breeding so that a controlled number of ewes are lambing at any given time. With ewes that have recently lambed, Kolthoff also offers tips on how to get them effectively rebred for a successful fall lambing season.

Every winter is unique. The 2020-21 winter had been mild until mid-February. Producers were able to keep the barns opened up and ventilated for better respiratory health.

“We haven’t had to put quite as much feed into them, which helps from a profitability standpoint,” she said. With the cold, producers like the Fruechtes focus on increasing energy into diets, especially after shearing.

And they'll look ahead to a spring that will also be unique.

Mikkel Pates is an agricultural journalist, creating print, online and television stories for Agweek magazine and Agweek TV.
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