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NASS: It's wet, but heat helps catch-up

The National Agricultural Statistics Service came out with its weekly crop, livestock and weather report. The June 6 report makes official what people already perceive: planting is far behind normal because of cool and wet conditions.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service came out with its weekly crop, livestock and weather report. The June 6 report makes official what people already perceive: planting is far behind normal because of cool and wet conditions.

Here are reports from individual states:

North Dakota

North Dakota: Planting only is halfway done through much of the state, according to the report. The agency reports farmers trying to finish planting, but also tackling fertilizing, tiling fields and equipment maintenance. Topsoil moisture is 41 percent surplus and subsoil moisture is 46 percent surplus. For maps: www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_

by_State/North_Dakota.

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Farmers in the state gained 15 to 20 percent on individual crops, which all normally are either finished or nearly so at this point in the year. Here are percentage progress summaries of individual crops:

Barley: 58 percent planted. Some 31 percent was emerged, 57 percentage points behind normal. Planting completion was as little as 14 percent in the northwest and 47 percent in the north- central counties.

Durum: 25 percent planted and 12 percent emerged, which is 66 points behind normal. Completion is 12 percent in the northwest and 42 percent in north-central North Dakota.

Spring wheat: 69 percent, 39 percent emerged, 50 points behind normal. Conditions are 78 percent good to excellent.

Oats: 72 percent planted, 36 percent emerged, or 53 points behind normal. Conditions are rated 80 percent good to excellent.

Canola: 51 percent planted, 19 percent emerged, 53 points behind normal.

Corn: 87 percent planted, 55 percent emerged, or 26 percent behind normal. Condition is 74 percent good to excellent.

Dry edible beans: 28 percent planted, 1 percent emerged, or 32 points behind average. Farthest behind is the northwest at 5 percent and 22 to 27 percent in north central, northeast and west-central areas.

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Dry peas: 43 percent planted, 26 percent emerged, or 69 points behind normal, and the largest deficit among the crops. Farthest behind is northwest, with 8 percent complete.

Flaxseed: 33 percent planted, 14 percent emerged, 52 points behind normal. Only 10 percent had been planted in the northwest.

Soybeans: 47 percent planted, 10 percent emerged, or 46 points behind average.

Sugar beets: 92 percent planted, 42 percent emerged, 48 points below normal. Average emergence is 90 percent.

Sunflowers: 26 percent planted, 3 percent emerged statewide, 26 points below normal. Completion in other areas: 6 percent northwest; 5 percent, northeast; 23 percent north-central and 17 percent west-central.

Minnesota

Minnesota: Farmers in the state were able to work 4.3 days in the field the first week of June, which is an improvement after excessive rains in many areas. Topsoil in the "surplus" category went from 45 percent to 30 percent.

Highs the first week of June ranged from the 80s in the northwest, west-central and central parts of the state, with the southwest and southeast hitting the mid-90s. Alexandria, Minn., picked up the most rainfall on the week, with 1.6 inches.

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Crop planting progress improved 20 to 30 points in key crops, with five-year averages almost always within a point or two of completed Here are crop-by-crop reports:

Corn: 95 percent planted, 79 percent emerged, 15 percentage points lower than average for the date. Condition 75 percent good to excellent.

Soybeans: 75 percent planted, 38 percent emerged, 36 points behind average.

Oats: 96 percent planted, 84 percent emerged, down 12 percent from average. Condition 68 percent good to excellent.

Spring wheat: 96 percent planted, 82 percent emerged, 11 points less than average. Condition 73 percent good to excellent.

Barley: 94 percent planted, 84 percent emerged, 9 points less than normal. Condition is 77 percent good to excellent.

Canola: 79 percent planted.

Potatoes: 94 percent planted. Condition: 55 percent good to excellent.

Sunflowers: 60 percent planted.

Sugar beets: 95 percent planted, 57 percent good to excellent.

Alfalfa: 21 percent first-cutting, 43 percent average for the date.

South Dakota

South Dakota: Topsoil and subsoil moisture ratings are both 98 percent adequate or better, although land percentages ranked "surplus" dropped 10 points to 33 percent and 37 percent, respectively.

No crop in the state was rated poor or worse on more than 4 percent of the acreage.

Other crop progress percentages:

Winter wheat: 68 percent in the boot, 85 percent five-year average. Condition 77 percent good to excellent.

Barley: 98 percent planted, 86 percent emerged, 94 percent average. Condition: 92 percent good to excellent.

Oats: 93 percent emerged, 98 percent average; 9 percent in the boot, 27 percent average. Condition: 87 percent good to excellent.

Spring wheat: 93 percent emerged, 100 percent average. In the boot: 3 percent, 28 percent average. Condition: 74 percent good to average.

Corn: 93 percent planted, 97 percent average; 73 percent emerged, 80 percent average.

Soybeans: 57 percent planted, 81 percent average; 20 percent emerged, 44 percent average.

Sorghum: 48 percent planted, 64 percent average; 7 percent emerged, 27 percent average.

Sunflowers: 35 percent planted, 35 percent average.

Alfalfa: 81 percent good to excellent.

Pasture: 90 percent of cattle have been moved to pasture, just short of last year's 92 percent.

Montana

Montana: Topsoil moisture in the state now is 96 percent adequate or surplus and subsoil moisture 84 percent adequate or surplus, compared with a five-year average of 63 percent for the date. Cooke City, Mont., received the most accumulated weekly precipitation at nearly 2.7 inches.

Range and pasture feed are rated good to excellent 88 percent of the state, up from 62 percent last week and up from the 57 percent five-year average. Only 73 percent of cattle had been moved to summer ranges, still less than the 85 percent average for the date.

Crop progress percentages:

Camelina: 93 percent planted; 89 percent emerged, 57 percent last year, no five-year average available.

Dry Peas: 96 percent planted; 89 percent emerged, 92 percent average.

Durum wheat: 85 percent planted, 95 percent average, 67 percent emerged, 81 percent average.

Lentils: 95 percent planted, 83 percent emerged, 89 percent average.

Mustard: 94 percent planted, 79 percent emerged, 82 percent average.

Oats: 91 percent planted, 74 percent emerged, 87 percent average.

Spring wheat: 95 percent planted, 83 percent emerged, 96 percent average.

Barley: 89 percent emerged, 16 percent boot stage, 6 percent average.

Sugar beets: 95 percent planted.

Related Topics: CROPS
Mikkel Pates is an agricultural journalist, creating print, online and television stories for Agweek magazine and Agweek TV.
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